Euglena


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Euglena

[yü′glē·nə]
(biology)
A genus of organisms with one or two flagella, chromatophores in most species, and a generally elongate, spindle-shaped body; classified as algae by botanists (Euglenophyta) and as protozoans by zoologists (Euglenida).

Euglena

 

a genus of microscopic motile single-celled organisms of the division Euglenophyta. The cell is spindle- or ribbon-shaped, with a pellicle in front, a single external flagellum, and a stigma next to the gullet. The ocellus is red. The chloroplasts are green and frequently complex in structure.

About 60 species of euglenas are known. They mainly inhabit shallow bodies of water, where they swim at any depth. Some species, such as Euglena viridis, can discard the flagellum and creep or, after taking on a spherical form, live immobile on the surface of the water, silt, or soil. Under unfavorable conditions they become transformed into spores. Nutrition is usually myxotrophic, or if there is a loss of chlorophyll, saprophytic. The organisms are distributed widely and sometimes cause the coloration of waters. Euglena sanguinea, which is rich in carotene, makes water red. Euglenas are used in laboratory experiments.

References in periodicals archive ?
IMMUNUM PRO harvesting is conducted via a proprietary closed-reactor technology for growing Euglena algae with a high 1,3 beta content, without the need for intense chemical or physical techniques for purification.
The scientists decided to use Euglena as a natural cargo carrier.
Euglena are readily available from biological supply houses and can be cultured indefinitely in house.
a Takamatsu-based company that helped develop the Euglena supplement, came up with the idea of making sweets containing the Euglena so that more people could enjoy the nutrient-rich organism and relayed the idea to the local confectioner.
cardunculus against the genotoxicity of ofloxacin and acridine orange (AO) in the Euglena gracilis assay.
They suggest that, at tow nitrogen levels, the carnivorous tendencies of the bladderwort allow it to overcome a nitrogen deficiency, ironically induced by Euglena prey, and deficiencies of other nutrients when nitrogen is more plentiful in the soil substrate.
Meanwhile, a group of Trent University researchers is helping the firm examine other applications for Euglena.
The individuals from this order, specially the genera Euglena, Phacus and Trachelomonas, which were the most species-rich in the present study, are commonly found in aquatic environments with high biochemical demand of oxygen, rich in organic matter and ammonia (REYNOLDS et al.
Studying the two-balloon device might yield some insights into biology because its movements vaguely resemble contortions that microbes known as euglena use to propel themselves, he adds.
In Euglena gracilis, mercury decreased the activities of four enzymes involved in the fixation of [CO.
Alder Fuller of Euglena Academy on Climate Change in the Pacific NW, Considerations for Building Designs.