Eumetazoa


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Eumetazoa

(yo͞o'mĕt'əzō`ə), subkingdom of the animal kingdom comprising all animals except the spongessponge,
common name for members of the aquatic animal phylum Porifera, and for the dried, processed skeletons of certain species used to hold water. Over 4,500 living species are known; they are found throughout the world, especially in shallow temperate waters.
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 and the wormlike mezozoans (see MezozoaMezozoa
, name of an animal subkingdom and also of the subkingdom's only phylum. The mezozoans are simple parasitic marine wormlike animals of only 20 to 30 cells, which are differentiated only into reproductive cells and ciliated cells.
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).

Eumetazoa

[yü‚med·ə′zō·ə]
(zoology)
A section of the animal kingdom that includes the phyla above the Porifera; contains those animals which have tissues or show some tissue formation and organ systems.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the phylogenetic assessment presented here, and in most other phylogenies, sponges are the sister group to the Eumetazoa.
adhaerens lacks the tight junctions or septate junctions that typically accompany adherens junctions in Eumetazoa (Ganot et al.
The monophyly of the Eumetazoa seems almost unquestioned.
The Metazoa consists of at least two ancient lineages of extant animals, the Eumetazoa (cnidarians, placozoans, and bilaterian phyla) and phylum Porifera (sponges) (e.
However, as the "epithelial level of organization" exhibited by Nematostella is an extremely ancient invention that dates to the common ancestor of the Eumetazoa (if not earlier), it is likely that epithelial repair mechanisms are similarly ancient, and core elements of these pathways may be deeply conserved across animals.
The situation has begun to change with the realization that core immune mechanisms are shared among Eumetazoa and with the steady accumulation of molecular evidence for basic shared characters among bilaterian immune cells.
Substantial phylogenetic evidence places the Cnidaria near the base of the Eumetazoa, possibly as the sister group to the Bilateria.