Euphorion


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Euphorion

(yo͞ofôr`ēən), c.275–187? B.C., Greek poet, b. Chalcis. He was made (c.223 B.C.) librarian at Antioch by Antiochus the Great and held the position until his death. Highly regarded by Latin poets of the 1st cent. B.C., the few remaining fragments of Euphorion's work show his indebtedness to such poets as CallimachusCallimachus,
fl. c.280–45 B.C., Hellenistic Greek poet and critic, b. Cyrene. Educated at Athens, he taught before obtaining work in the Alexandrian library. There he drew up a catalog, with such copious notes that it constituted a full literary history.
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Euphorion

 

in ancient Greek mythology, a beautiful youth who was born of the union of Achilles and Helen, who were transported after their death to the Islands of the Blessed. Goethe used the myth of Euphorion in Faust, in which Euphorion is the son of Faust and Helen.

References in periodicals archive ?
These perfect numbers are also attested by Euphorion in the Mopsopia, when he says: `.
It is a pity that the context in Euphorion does not survive, and that the line is only preserved, and indeed interpreted, by so late a source.
6) Elias now relaxes the turgidly elementary maths: enter Euphorion (8.
7) If it is right, Euphorion could be echoing the standard definition of perfect numbers given in Euclid, El.
Was there a tradition of exemplifying perfect numbers from poetry, a tradition in which the lines of both Hesiod and Euphorion were originally quoted?
It is far from clear that Euphorion is referring to a text of Euclid himself, rather than that he is paraphrasing a mathematical cliche worded in this way before Euclid laid it down.
16) Euphorion is not known to have had any direct connection with Alexandria,(17) though he certainly knew Alexandrian poetry.
34) We saw, too, that Nicomachus and, following him,[Elias], exemplified hyperperfect and defective numbers by analogies with bodies which had too many or too few parts; so it seems possible that Euphorion himself used some sort of analogy between perfect numbers and body parts.
The implication may be that Euphorion is offering an etymology for perfect numbers, If Barigazzi is right about the context, then one possibility comes to mind.
This is unusual: Titans and Giants are normally only endowed with the standard number of hands, and one wonders why the Orphic poet or his source made the change A third possibility, of course, is that the context in Euphorion is not about dismemberment at all, but (perhaps) concerns medicine--healing, or the sort of subject which might have justified the line's inclusion in a medical compilation.