Euphrosyne


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Euphrosyne

(yo͞ofrŏs`ənē'): see GracesGraces,
in Greek mythology, personifications of beauty, charm, and grace; daughters of Zeus and the oceanid Eurynome. Also known as the Charites, they were usually three in number and were called Aglaia, Thalia, and Euphrosyne.
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Euphrosyne

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Euphrosyne, asteroid 31 (the 31st asteroid to be discovered, on September 1, 1854), is approximately 270 kilometers in diameter and has an orbital period of 5.5 years. Euphrosyne, whose appellation means cheerfulness or joy, was named after one of the three Graces (the other two are Thalia and Aglaja). Euphrosyne was a daughter of Zeus and Eurynome. Like its mythological namesake, the asteroid confers the “grace” of joy to natives in whose chart it is prominent.

Sources:

Kowal, Charles T. Asteroids: Their Nature and Utilization. Chichester, West Sussex, UK: Ellis Horwood Limited, 1988.
Room, Adrian. Dictionary of Astronomical Names. London: Routledge, 1988.
Schwartz, Jacob. Asteroid Name Encyclopedia. St. Paul, MN: Llewellyn Publications, 1995.

Euphrosyne

[yü′fräz·ən·ē]
(astronomy)
An asteroid with a diameter of about 154 miles (248 kilometers), mean distance from the sun of 3.15 astronomical units, and B-type (C-like) surface composition.

Euphrosyne

one of the Graces; epitome of beauty in joy. [Gk. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 481]
See: Beauty

Euphrosyne

one of Graces; name means ‘festivity.’ [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 96]
See: Joy
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dalloway's mind," (26) and meet up with the Euphrosyne in Lisbon.
The poems by Euphrosyne Keefer were written for her grandson who spoke only French at the time.
Knight's rendition of Phrosyne's death might well have inspired the various descriptions of female encirclement--both in terms of fabrics and of bodies--that surround Euphrosyne, a beautiful woman in the anonymously published novel of Thomas Hope, Anastasius; or, Memoirs of a Modern Greek (1819), which Murray published and Byron admired.
Rowland ("Melville Answers" 9) notes that the image of the congregation's "sprightly nods and becks" is borrowed from lines 25-30 of Milton's L'Allegro in which the poet invokes the spirit of mirth, Euphrosyne, who is one of the Three Graces.
In fact, Euphrosyne has no plans for her to become a prostitute.
of the monks' wonder and of the related idea that Euphrosyne is
Another example, from mid-eighth-century Byzantine Italy, is Euphrosyne, deaconess and abbess of the women's monastery of SS.
James Fenton, "The Mummy's Secret," review of Ancient Faces: Mummy Portraits From Ancient Egypt, by Susan Walker and Morris Bierbrier; The Mysterious Fayum Portraits, by Euphrosyne Doxiadis; and, Portraits and Masks: Burial Customs in Roman Egypt, ed.
It is Euphrosyne, mythological transfiguration of a recently deceased friend.
Bravo "Aspectos de la cultura griega en la Peninsula Iberica durante la Edad Media", Euphrosyne 17 (1989) 361-372.
As Orlando pursues Sasha with fervor, he is confronted by his fiancee, Euphrosyne, who denounces their betrothal, saying, "The treachery of men.