Euryclea

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Euryclea

Ulysses’ nurse; recognized him by scar on thigh. [Gk. Lit.: Odyssey]
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The Court of Appeals' Holdings in Sargiss and Eurycleia Partners, LP
39) It occurs, for example, in book 19 of the Odyssey, when the maid Eurycleia, while washing Ulysses' feet, unexpectedly recognizes her long-lost master by his scar, and with tear-filled eyes reaches out to touch his chin.
The aptly named Gustave Boulanger's Ulysses Recognized by Eurycleia, which gained him a Prix de Rome in 1849, sums up everything that was wrong with academic art teaching in the mid-nineteenth century.
After returning to Ithaca and killing Penelope's suitors, Odysseus tells the servant Eurycleia "Rejoice in your heart, old woman, and restrain yourself and do not cry aloud.
Finally, with the help of his son Telemachus and the guidance of Pallas, Odysseus lands on his home shores again and is recognized by his childhood nurse, Eurycleia.
When Telemachus goes to see his mother he is first greeted by the old nurse Eurycleia, whose tears and hugs are only outdone by those of his mother, longing for news of her husband.
Russo, in commenting on recognition by Eurycleia and Philoetius,
The story of Odysseus, hero of the Trojan War, as told by four women--his wife Penelope, the sorceress Circe, his patron goddess Athena, and his loyal nurse Eurycleia.
This is seen most visibly when his old nurse Eurycleia recognizes him by means of the scar on his leg and is on the verge of informing Penelope: Odysseus prevents her by grasping her throat with his right hand, and Penelope, though nearby, remains utterly oblivious to what has taken place (19.
The Penelopiad clearly teems with anachronisms, as when Penelope refers to her mother's "short attention span," (Atwood 2005, 11) or when Eurycleia adapts Dr.
one to join the plot, stays in character when, alone with Eurycleia, he