Eusebius of Nicomedia


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Eusebius of Nicomedia

(yo͞osē`bēəs, nĭkōmē`dēə), d. 342, Christian churchman and theologian, leader of the heresy of ArianismArianism
, Christian heresy founded by Arius in the 4th cent. It was one of the most widespread and divisive heresies in the history of Christianity. As a priest in Alexandria, Arius taught (c.
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. He was bishop of Nicomedia (330–39) and patriarch of Constantinople (339–42); Eusebius was powerful because of his influence with Roman Emperor Constantine I and particularly with the emperor's son, Constantius II. He sheltered Arius in 321 and fought his condemnation at Nicaea (see Nicaea, First Council ofNicaea, First Council of,
325, 1st ecumenical council, convened by Roman Emperor Constantine the Great to solve the problems raised by Arianism. It has been said that 318 persons attended, but a more likely number is 225, including every Eastern bishop of importance, four
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). Eusebius signed the Nicene formulary but was exiled by Constantine shortly afterward. Eusebius' influence on the emperor's sister Constantia, however, soon won him his reprieve (328). As adviser to Constantius, a committed Arian, he systematically advanced a moderate Arianism throughout the empire.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Ambrose, the word homoousios was used to openly contradict the Arian sentiment of a letter by Eusebius of Nicomedia which had been read out at the Council of Nicaea: "If we speak of a true and uncreated Son of God, we begin to confess him `consubstantial' with the Father.
Suspected connections of the term homoousios with "materialistic" representations of the Godhead explain the harsh reactions of both Eusebius of Nicomedia and Arius, who remind us of the bishops who condemned Paul of Samosata at the Synod of Antioch.
The phrase occurs in what is commonly considered Arius' earliest surviving work, the letter to Eusebius of Nicomedia, printed by Opitz as Urkunde 1 and dated by him c.
In the process of rehabilitating the reputed heretic, Lienhard examines Marcellus s theology as found in his primary work, the Contra Asterium, and then as found in the writings of his contemporary opponents (Eusebius of Caesarea, Eusebius of Nicomedia, Paulinus of Tyre, Narcissus of Neronias and Asterius the Sophist).
in Nicomedia Eusebii Calesini/Caelesti', where someone ignorant of Eusebius of Nicomedia has interpolated `Calisti' from the entries in October or September.
One must also take into account that it was bishop Eusebius of Nicomedia who baptized Constantine shortly before he died.
But the irresistible rise of Eusebius of Nicomedia and the growing concord between Eusebius of Caesarea and the emperor which resulted in a campaign against the 'Nicene' party in the late 320s to early 330s must have alarmed Marcellus.