Eustathius

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Eustathius,

d. c.1194, Byzantine scholar, archbishop of Salonica (from 1175). He became renowned as master of the orators at Hagia Sophia, Constantinople, then a center of learning. He lectured on Homer and Pindar. As bishop Eustathius was active in the affairs of Salonica and secured religious freedom for its inhabitants when the Normans captured it. He attempted to reform the monasteries but failed and was temporarily obliged to leave the city. Works of interest include commentaries (especially on Homer), which are valuable for extracts from lost Greek works, also a history (1185) of the Norman conquest of Sicily and S Italy, funeral orations, and The Reform of Monastic Life. Michael AcominatusAcominatus, Michael
, or Michael Choniates
, c.1140–1220, Byzantine writer and metropolitan of Athens. Acominatus' speeches, poems, and letters give much information about medieval Athens, which he, a classicist, found barbarous and degenerate.
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 was his student and friend.
References in periodicals archive ?
Volgens die Homeriese Probieme wat aan Herakleitos en Eustathios toegeskryf word, is die Hefaistos-figuur 'n allegorie van die skeppende vuur wat die heelal geskep het (Hardie 1985:15).
Among the 13 papers here are discussions of ancient Greek polyandry as reflected in the mythic/epic tradition, a second preliminary report on archaeological field work in ancient Kalydon during 2005, Macedonian craftsmanship in Crimean tombs from the late fourth to the early third centuries BC, identifying incubation areas in pagan and early Christian times, and Eustathios of Thessaloniki on Homer's similes as an example of Homeric listeners in Byzantium.
The Theory of Ideas and its Application in the Commentaries of Eustathios on the Epics of Homer.
correctly points out, Basil's ascetic teaching and practical advice, influenced by monastic experiments of the time, particularly those of Eustathios of Sebaste, were designed for the benefit of all interested in bettering themselves, not just for a segregated elite.