inclusion-exclusion principle

(redirected from Exclusion-inclusion)

inclusion-exclusion principle

[¦in‚klü·zhən ′eks‚klü·zhən ‚prin·sə·pəl]
(mathematics)
The principle that, if A and B are finite sets, the number of elements in the union of A and B can be obtained by adding the number of elements in A to the number of elements in B, and then subtracting from this sum the number of elements in the intersection of A and B.
References in periodicals archive ?
A brief history of the idea of social exclusion-inclusion
For example, in terms of policy frames it is important to acknowledge that the contemporary exclusion-inclusion dynamic around welfare-to-work and employment policies has a much longer history in the binary category of 'deserving' and 'undeserving poor'.
She claims a wider understanding of the exclusion-inclusion issue is needed--one that includes discrimination on the grounds of gender, ethnicity, disability, age, religion, sexuality, language, region, and class.