Exekias


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Exekias

(ĕksĕk`ēəs), c.555–530 B.C., Greek potter and painter. He worked mainly in the black-figure style. Eleven vases and a series of fifteen plaques have been attributed to him, including an amphora depicting Achilles and Ajax in the midst of a game (Vatican).

Exekias

 

Greek potter and vase painter of the third quarter of the sixth century B.C. Exekias was the most outstanding representative of the late black figure style. His works include painted amphorae, for example, Achilles in Battle With Penthesilea and Memnon With a Negro and Hercules Fighting the Nemean Lion (both housed in the Antiquities Collection, Berlin), as well as Ajax With the Body of Achilles (Glyptothek, Munich). He also made kylikes, including the Nike kylix (Louvre, Paris) and Dionysos Crossing the Sea (Glyptothek, Munich).

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For instance, adhesive patches from the 1970s on an Archaic Greek vase by Exekias have had to be removed; they were shrinking, thus causing cracks and destabilising the vessel.
5 has been attributed to the hand of the 'Painter of the Vatican Mourner', a vase-painter associated with Exekias and Group E.
The Archaic passion for contour is a legacy of the black-figure style, epitomized by Exekias.
As Mommsen concludes, Exekias has here supplied a threnody of images every bit as poised and poignant as a poet's commissioned lament.
9) With some more recent iconographies too, such as Achilles and Ajax dicing, first represented by Exekias in around 540 BC, the Berlin Painter was one of the last exponents.
That an artist should both explore old themes and pioneer new ones is not in itself surprising--it is a peculiarity of the great black-figure painter Exekias that so much of his iconography was unprecedented.
The black-figure masters of the mid-century, Lydos and Exekias, would capitalize on the effect imparted by a spare setting.
3)--fragmentary, admittedly--painted by Exekias (active c.
These are the only known Exekias vases in private hands.
The prone scheme for the lion fight appears to have been first painted by Exekias, but his version is preserved only in fragments.
52) about the same time as the scheme of Herakles and the lion wrestling prone first appears in the repertory of Exekias.
74) Indeed, one example of a fragmentary amphora by a painter close to Exekias depicts Herakles both on the shoulder, where he fights Cerberus, and the belly, where he accompanies a group of divinities who watch Demeter as she mounts a chariot.