Exhumation


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exhumation

[‚eks·yü′mā·shən]
(geology)
The uncovering or exposure through erosion of a former surface, landscape, or feature that had been buried by subsequent deposition.

Exhumation

 

the removal of a corpse from a burial site. According to Soviet law, a body may be exhumed at the request of an investigator, who must state the purpose of doing so: an investigatory view (or a second investigatory view) of the body, identification of the deceased by an acquaintance or an expert, or presentation of the body for primary, additional, or follow-up forensic expertise (medical, biological, or toxicological). The most frequent reason for exhumation is to examine a body that should have been subjected to forensic medical expertise owing to the circumstances of death but that was buried without an autopsy.

Witnesses, a forensic medical expert, and, if necessary, another specialist, such as a health inspector, are present at an exhumation. The investigator prepares a protocol of the exhumation, which includes photographs of the grave, gravestone, coffin, and corpse.

References in periodicals archive ?
In the circumstances, to allow the exhumation of Angela's remains while refusing to permit the exhumation of those of Brenda would be to bring about the splitting up of an existing family grave.
The family are raising money to pay the legal costs of the exhumation at evelynclarkefundraiser@gmail.
The ground conditions largely determine the body's rate of decomposition," exhumation specialist Peter Mitchell (http://www.
It expressed hope that the exhumation would be conducted "with the greatest possible respect and care" and would clear up "any doubts that might exist" as to how Neruda died.
The foundation that guards his legacy said in a statement that it had been informed by the authorities of the exhumation plans a few days ago.
The evidence was strong enough for the North West Wales coroner to sign an exhumation certificate.
Palestinian officials had originally planned a military ceremony to accompany the reburial of the remains after their exhumation.
Arafat's successor, Mahmoud Abbas, authorized the exhumation despite strong cultural and religious taboos against disturbing a gravesite, apparently to avoid any suggestion that the current leadership was standing in the way of a thorough investigation.
During the exhumation a third sample was taken to be kept in Britain for the family's peace of mind.
Regarding memory, Renshaw perceptively clarifies the diverse agendas, conflicts and tensions that surround the exhumation process.
Since the 1980s, the dominant paradigm for investigations of atrocities has been the use of forensic exhumation of human remains.
He recently ordered an exhumation of Bolivar's body, having teeth and bone fragments removed for DNA testing.