angst

(redirected from Existential despair)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

angst

(in Existentialist philosophy) the dread caused by man's awareness that his future is not determined but must be freely chosen
References in periodicals archive ?
But Barlow's stories traverse such deep, psychological ground that they dredge up more existential despair than laughter.
Clients who experience career transitions, become unemployed, retire, or are unable to work because of illness or injury may lose a significant part of their identity and feel an existential despair.
One immediately identifies and yokes together the existential despair and horror of Poe with the isolation and civil disobedience of Thoreau, both allegories for the realities Liu Xia faces daily.
Whenever the dogs are not in harness running full-tilt through the woods, they lapse into ennui, worry, lust for power, self-absorption, existential despair, or plain boredom.
History offers an affirmation of life over death, and a path beyond existential despair.
Unlike those pretenders who play in dark alleys and think they're tough, James Sallis writes from an authentic noir sensibility, a state of mind that hovers between amoral indifference and profound existential despair.
Yet from the perspective of the history of philosophy, this textual characteristic need cause neither existential despair nor cognitive or ethical relativism.
The upshot, Fraser confessed, was that he fell into 'a kind of existential despair .
In their interior journeys, they find themselves on the brink of either existential despair or mystical discovery--what Lispector called "brainstorm.
Hirsch postulates that although Schubert did not yet share Mayrhofer's existential despair, he was attracted to the poem partly as a means of appealing to the singer Johann Michael Vogl, who was a passionate classicist and who soon became one of Schubert's most important champions.
It proved extremely useful to present the patients with an extensive list of psychosocial triggers: stress caused by demand overload; life uncertainties; distress caused by identity struggles or value conflict; and existential despair, such as unresolved grief, death, dying, guilt, and lack of meaning in life.
Gaining a sense of control over their brain injury is central to healing existential despair.