Exogenous

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exogenous

[‚ek′säj·ə·nəs]
(biology)
Due to an external cause; not arising within the organism.
Growing by addition to the outer surfaces.
(physiology)
Pertaining to those factors in the metabolism of nitrogenous substances obtained from food.

Exogenous

 

in botany, a term referring to the development of lateral organs in the peripheral cell layers of the main axis of a particular plant organ. Examples of exogenous organs are the leaves that develop in the form of external nodes on the growing point of shoots, root hairs (which are lateral growths of root integuments), and some epidermal growths (trichotomes) of a plant’s aboveground organs.

References in periodicals archive ?
These sites account for ~25% of the mutations in cancers overall (4, 7), but many cancers acquire their own unique mutation patterns based on exogeneous and endogenous factors (4, 8).
As any other strategic resource, networks may evolve over time shaped by exogeneous and endogeneous forces such as managerial action and/or policy events.
Events/jolts or alignment processes: There was a recognition that, too often, studies of organizational change rely on exogeneous shocks as a causal force.
Suppose the dictator's polity is hit by an exogeneous shock, such as an increase in the rate of economic growth, as depicted in Wintrobe's Figure 3.
Based upon this result, we study the impact of changing exogeneous variables upon the approval rate for immigration.
Key words: biogeochemical cycling; cyclo-stationary maximum cross-covariance analysis, (MCCA); exogeneous predictability; lake ecosystem; meteorological variables and biological variables; multivariate time series; PluBsee (northern Germany); seasonal succession; system analysis; weather impact.
The [lambda]'s represent the effectiveness of manufacturer and retailer long term advertising, respectively, and [delta] can be thought of as an exogeneous decay rate of goodwill.
The degree of law enforcement is therefore exogeneous.
The reason for noting the governmental/regulatory dimension to exchange theories of marketing is to observe that we cannot treat government as a disinterested or exogeneous component in an exchange perspective on political marketing, as government politicians play a significant role in political marketing exchanges, and control of government is the key objective in political processes.
In other words, the sort of exogeneous conditions that might have facilitated export-led growth were hardly present, at least until the mid-1970s.