rotation

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Related to External rotation: Internal rotation

rotation

1. Spinning motion of a celestial body or a group of gravitationally bound bodies, such as a galaxy, about an axis, as distinct from orbital revolution. Almost all celestial bodies show some degree of rotation. Young stars arrive on the main sequence with a high rotation rate; this results from the conservation of angular momentum during their collapse from a cloud of interstellar gas. As a star ages, structural changes in its interior and interactions with its surroundings produce changes in its speed of rotation. The hottest (O and B) stars have very great rotation rates of about 200–250 km s–1. Sunlike stars spin more slowly as they age, although some are able to retain their rapid rotation. The faster the rate of rotation the broader and shallower the star's spectral lines and the stronger the magnetic field (see corona). See also differential rotation; direct motion; synchronous rotation.
2. One complete turn of a celestial body about its axis. The Earth takes one sidereal day to make one rotation. Ideally the rotation period of other bodies is measured as the time interval between successive passages of a meridian line on the surface across the center of the disk, as seen from Earth. The solid surface may however be unobservable and indirect measurements, as by radar, are then employed. The rotation period of a gaseous body, such as the Sun or the planet Jupiter, varies with latitude, being greatest at the equator (see differential rotation).

rotation

[rō′tā·shən]
(computer science)
An operation performed on data in a register of the central processing unit, in which all the bits in the register are shifted one position to the right or left, and the endmost bit, which is shifted out of the register, is carried around to the position at the opposite end of the register.
(mathematics)
(mechanics)
Also known as rotational motion.
Motion of a rigid body in which either one point is fixed, or all the points on a straight line are fixed.
Angular displacement of a rigid body.
The motion of a particle about a fixed point.
References in periodicals archive ?
This randomized controlled pilot study investigated the effects of a myofascial release intervention on the external rotation of the lower extremities in dancers.
Electromyographic analysis of the rotator cuff and deltoid musculature during common shoulder external rotation exercises.
In our case, the "avoidance behavior" was a gait with external rotation of the lower limb as a compensatory strategy to reduce impingement and therefore pain.
19 In another two non randomized studies have suggested that Maitland postero-anterior or anterio-posterior glides are effective in improving shoulder external rotation range of movement.
Assessment of ROM Shoulder ROM Patient Fulcrum Position Flexion Supine Greater tuberosity Abduction Supine Coracoid process Adduction Supine Coracoid process External rotation Supine Olecranon process Internal rotation Supine Olecranon process Extension Prone Greater tuberosity Shoulder ROM Starting Position of the Limb Flexion Arm by the side of the body Abduction Arm by the side of the body Adduction Arm by the side of the body External rotation Shoulder in 90[degrees] abduction and elbow in 90[degrees] flexion Internal rotation Shoulder in 90[degrees] abduction and elbow in 90[degrees] flexion Extension Arm by the side of the body Table 2.
Skin strains with the foot in external rotation were significantly greater than when the foot was upright (p = 0.
Grasped the hock and applied mild external rotation and traction using other hand.
Physical examination revealed atrophy of the supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles (FIGURE 1) and external rotation and shoulder abduction (in the scapular plane) resistance tests revealed weakness of these muscles.
Range of movement was full in abduction and flexion, but both internal and external rotation was still limited and the patient continued with physiotherapy for active range of movement exercises.
4) More recently, however, immobilisation in external rotation (Fig.
Exercises several times a day, in forward flexion, external rotation, internal rotation, and abduction are helpful.
The physical examination included assessment of lumbopelvic endurance (flexion, extension, and lateral flexion), lower extremity flexibility (gastrocnemius, soleus, iliotibial band, hamstring, and quadriceps), muscular strength (hip external rotation and hip abduction), quality of movement (lateral step down test), and power (timed hop test, cross-over hop test).

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