Eyam


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Eyam

a village in N central England, in Derbyshire. When plague reached the village in 1665 the inhabitants, led by the Rev. Mompesson, isolated themselves to prevent it spreading further: as a result most of them died, including Mompesson's family
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Roses of Eyam, Morlan Centre, Aberystwyth Nov 26-28, tickets 01970 612617 or louchetheatre.
Eyam was a village in Derbyshire where, when the plague arrived in its midst in the summer of 1665 (carried by fleas in a bundle of cloth delivered to a local tailor) chose to quarantine itself from the outside world rather than let the infection spread.
Soon turn left on unclassified roads to Great Hucklow through Foolow to Eyam (2).
He was also noted for the highly informed talks he gave about his field collecting expeditions and his musical interests at festivals large and small, such as Sidmouth International Folk Festival, the National Folk Festival at Sutton Bonington, and the Traditional Singing Weekend at Eyam in Derbyshire (8-9 November 1997).
The Secrets of the Dead episode begins not with HIV but by investigating why so many residents of Eyam, England, survived the black death when it hit the remote village in 1665.
When the plague claimed its first victim in the Derby, shire village of Eyam on 7 September 1665 the villagers were faced with a terrible dilemma, one that presents itself to all those with a communicable disease.
In a small country like ours, such a law very quickly translates into a restraint on the growth of a dynamic service line such as EYAM.
Society chairman Clifford Drake told how the group arranged a visit to the village-run Eyam Museum in Derbyshire in September last year.
Lodders help National Trust take control of Eyam Hall A West Midlands law firm has helped pave the way for the National Trust to take on the management of its latest historic property.
Near The Barrel is the historic plague village of Eyam where the original sites of the homes of many of the victims of the black death can still be located.
History enthusiasts can visit Eyam where, in 1665, villagers placed themselves in quarantine to prevent the plague, which came in cloth from London, from spreading to neighbouring areas.
It's the perfect base from which to explore the national park, including the historic Derbyshire villages and towns of Eyam, Ashford-in-the-Water and Bakewell, and the Tissington Trail.