Ezion-geber


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Ezion-geber

(ē`zēŏn-gē`bər) or

Ezion-gaber

(–gā`–) [both: Heb.,=giant's backbone], ancient port, on the Gulf of Aqaba. The site, near AqabaAqaba
, town (1996 est. pop. 52,000), SW Jordan, at the head of the Gulf of Aqaba, on the border with Israel. It is the only Jordanian port with direct access to the Red Sea; it remains the trade entrepôt to Iraq. Phosphates are the chief export.
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, is now some distance from the shore, which is advancing. The Bible reveals the existence of a port there from the reign of Solomon to at least that of Uzziah in the 8th cent. B.C. (Num. 33.35,36; Deut. 2.8; 1 Kings 9.26; 22.48; 2 Chron. 8.17). Excavations were carried out (1938–40) under American auspices. The largest copper refineries ever found to have existed in the ancient world were unearthed at the level of the oldest of the five periods of settlement. Trade relations existed with Phoenicia, Arabia, Egypt, Sinai, and Greece (5th cent. B.C.). Nearby was the ancient port of ElatElat
or Eilat
[Heb.,=trees], city (1994 pop. 35,700), S Israel, a port on the Gulf of Aqaba, an arm of the Red Sea. It is strategically located near the Sinai peninsula, Jordan, and Saudi Arabia and is Israel's gateway to Africa and East Asia.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In the south, Solomon's kingdom did in fact extend as far as the Red Sea, described in the Bible as Yam Suf (Sea of Reeds), which in all likelihood was the reason Solomon chose Ezion-geber as his seaport, in addition to the one at Joppa (Jaffa) on the Mediterranean coast.
This would point unmistakably to the type of merchant ship operating from the copper town of Ezion-geber on the Gulf of Akaba.
Solomon made Ezion-geber not only a seaport but his chief industrial city as well.
An example of this occurs when McKinsey challenges 1 Kings 9:26 for saying that Ezion-geber was "on the shore of the Red Sea" (p.
In terms of modern geography, McKinsey is right, because Ezion-geber was located on what is now called the Gulf of Aqabah.
King Solomon also built a fleet of ships at Ezion-geber, that is near Elath on the shore of the Red Sea in the land of Edom.
Some two centuries later, King Jehoshaphat of Judah tried to revive the Red Sea-Indian Ocean trade, but the venture failed before the fleet was even aweigh: Jehoshaphat built Tarshish ships to sail to Ophir for gold, but he did not set sail for the ships were wrecked at Ezion-geber (I Kg.