Federal Aviation Administration

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Federal Aviation Administration

(FAA), component of the U.S. Department of Transportation that sets standards for the air-worthiness of all civilian aircraft, inspects and licenses them, and regulates civilian and military air traffic through its air traffic control centers. It investigates air accidents and in response may establish new rules, for example, on de-icing and air-frame inspections. It also promotes the development of a national system of airports. Established as a federal agency in 1958 to regulate air commerce, it assumed many of the functions of the Civil Aeronautics Board (CAB; est. as the Civil Aeronautics Authority, 1938) and the Airways Modernization Board. The agency became part of the newly formed Dept. of Transportation in 1967. In 1981–82, it took over authority for the limited regulation of domestic routes and fares from the CAB, which was abolished by 1985.

Federal Aviation Administration (FAA)

The arm of the U.S. Department of Transportation responsible for the promotion, regulation, and safety of civil aviation and for the safe and efficient use of airspace, which is shared by civil and military aircraft.
References in periodicals archive ?
The FAA found 150 instances our of 267,000 entries where a paperwork discrepancy was found," he told the Seattle Times in a written response it elected not to print.
Her fundamental mistake is to argue that the FAA should pursue safety literally at all cost.
But while common sense might suggest that smaller commuter planes should also carry a GPWS--after all, they run the same risk of crashing--the FAA didn't act.
The FAA said the planes were 1,100 feet apart vertically.
Having taken its lumps from the inspector general, the FAA seems to be getting tougher.
Through this contract, GTSI will be instrumental in helping the FAA do three things: First, reduce the total cost of ownership of IT hardware.
Retirement of ex-astronaut draws attention to FAA pilot age rule.
FAA has separate processes for approving ground systems and certifying aircraft equipment for safe use in the national airspace system.
It may offer an opportunity for the authority to look at its resources and see whether or not priorities can be shifted, to pay back the FAA.
Both of the planes, according to FAA data, were Fairchild Swearingen's 19-seat turboprops, model number SA227AC, also known as the Metro 3, which the annual report of the Regional Airline Association indicates is very popular.
Consultants for the airline worked with lower-level FAA officials, but not with FAA headquarters.