fava bean

(redirected from FAVA)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms.
Related to FAVA: Fava beans
Enlarge picture
broad bean
Enlarge picture
broad bean
Enlarge picture
broad bean
Enlarge picture
broad bean
Enlarge picture
broad bean

broad bean

A legume member of the pea family with very large pods and beans. A very hardy plant that's easy to grow. Beans and leaves are edible. There have been times in history where all crops failed except beans, which kept the population from starvation. They have so much protein, they are called the meat of the poor. Highly nutritious and full of many essential nutrients required by the body. One of the main foods around the world for 5000 years, especially the mediterranean Greeks and Romans. Fava beans have the highest amount of L-dopa of any plant. L-dopa, a brain neurotransmitter, helps control hypertension and Parkinsons disease and stimulates the pituitary gland to produce Human Growth Hormone (HGH) -the most powerful anti aging substance known that keeps everything working smoothly in your body like when you were a teenager. HGH Improves athletic performance, strength, muscle mass. Fava beans help women with hormone issues, PMS, menopause. Since the pituitary gland controls the entire endocrine system, it also affects thyroid, sex hormones, adrenals (energy), immune system. Contains vitamin B17, known as the cancer-beating vitamin. Protects against malaria. Very high in fiber and oliosaccharides. Favas have potassium which helps maintain blood pressure and regulate the heart. Lots of vitamin A for healthy skin, good vision and bone development. Helps lower LDL- bad cholesterol. A small handful has TEN GRAMS of protein. Low fat content helps bodybuilders stay lean while gaining muscle. Want natural growth hormones? Eat Fava beans! Start easy to test one or two because a few unhealthy people might have a bad allergic reaction known as favism. I have a raw food fava bean recipe in my book Heal Yourself 101 that I eat all the time.
References in periodicals archive ?
Canned or thawed frozen favas can be sauteed with a mixture of seasonal vegetables and served over pasta.
In a blender or food processor, puree the favas with a small amount of mushroom or vegetable stock, olive oil, and fresh minced garlic.
Paula Wolfert, a well-known cookbook author and culinarian, likes to use very small, fresh favas in a raw Spanish fava gazpacho with sherry-soaked raisins.
Favas can be found in dried form and in canned form but, most chefs agree, fresh beans are really the only way to go.
Maselli calls favas an "ancient" ingredient and flinches at the suggestion that they could be considered trendy.
He currently is serving an appetizer of pureed favas on grilled bruschetta.
Food writers say favas need a long soaking and many hours of cooking.
The taste of fresh favas stewed or simmered is somewhere between that of peas and lima beans.
Favas are mostly self-fertile but can be cross-pollinated by insects.
Fresh favas are quite perishable; the pods mold and turn black quickly, and the beans in the pods also mold readily.
The sauteed vegetable dish pairs favas with the smoky flavor of Jerusalem artichokes.