Faber-Jackson relation

(redirected from Faber-Jackson Law)

Faber–Jackson relation

A correlation between the luminosity of an elliptical galaxy and the velocity dispersion of its stars. The gravitational potential of the galaxy is thus related to the kinetic energy of its constituents, so that the brightest most massive galaxies have the higher velocity dispersions. This relation, discovered by S.M. Faber and R.E. Jackson in 1976, is used in galactic distance determination. See also Tully–Fisher method.

Faber-Jackson relation

[¦fāb·ər ′jak·sən ri‚lā·shən]
(astronomy)
A relation between the spectral dispersion caused by the random motions of stars in an elliptical galaxy and the galaxy's intrinsic luminosity.