Fads


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Fads

Barbie doll
popular dress-up doll; extremely conventional and feminine. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 179]
Beatle cut
hairstyle with bangs, sides trimmed just below ears; banned by many school boards (1960s). [Am Hist.: Sann, 251–254]
bee-stung lips
ruby red and puckered female mouth make-up (1920s). [Am. Hist.: Griffith, 198]
bobbed hair
short, curly boyish hairstyle caused shock (1920s). [Am. Hist.: Griffith, 198]
bobby socks
female short socks that epitomized 1940s teen fashion. [Am. Cult.: Misc.]
car-stuffing
one example: 23 people stuffed in a Volkswagen bug. (1950s—1960s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 300]
chain letters
at height in 1930s, craze crippled postal service. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 97–104]
coonskin caps
raccoon cap with tail worn in recognition of Davy Crockett, Daniel Boone revival (1950s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 30]
flagpole sitting
sitting alone at the top of a flagpole; craze comes and goes. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 39–46]
frisbees
tossing plastic disks was favorite pastime, especially among collegians (1970s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 178]
gold fish-swallowing
collegiate craze in 1930s. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 289–292]
hip-flask
liquor bottle designed to fit into back pockets; indispensable commodity during Prohibition. [Am. Hist.: Allen, 70]
hula hoops
large plastic hoops revolved around body by hip action (1950s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 145–149]
Kewpie doll
designed by Rose O’Neill and modeled on her baby brother; millions were made (starting about 1910). [Am. Hist.: WB, 5: 240–241]
marathon dancing
dance contests, the longest of which lasted 24 weeks and 5 days (1930s). [Am. Hist.: McWhirter, 461]
marathon eating
contestants consume ridiculous quantities of food; craze comes and goes. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 77–78]
miniskirt
skirts hemmed at mid-thigh or higher; heyday of the leg in fashion world (1960s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 255–263]
mud baths
warm mud applied on skin supposedly to retain fresh, young complexion (1940s). [Am. Hist.: Griffith, 198]
panty raids
collegiate craze in the 1940s and 1950s. [Am. Hist.: Misc.]
raccoon coats
popular attire for collegians (1920s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 175]
rolled stockings
worn by flappers to achieve risque effect (1920s). [Am. Hist.: Griffith, 198]
saddle shoes
an oxford, usually white, with a saddle of contrasting color, usually brown; a favorite fad of the 1940s and 1950s. [Am. Pop. Culture: Misc.]
Silly Putty
synthetic clay; uses ranging from bouncing balls to false mustaches. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 165]
skateboards
mini surfboard supported on roller-skate wheels; 1960s craze enjoyed renaissance. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 151–152]
telephone booth-stuffing
bodies piled on top of one another inside a telephone booth; 1950s and 1960s craze. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 297]
tulipomania
tulip craze in Holland during which fortunes were lost. [Eur. Hist.: WB, 19: 394]
yo-yo
child’s toy that periodically overwhelms public’s fancy. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 173]
zoot suits
bizarre outfits with the “reet pleats” (1940s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 275]
References in classic literature ?
We are willing to give 30 pounds a quarter, or 120 pounds a year, so as to recompense you for any little inconvenience which our fads may cause you.
The unusual salary, the curious conditions, the light duties, all pointed to something abnormal, though whether a fad or a plot, or whether the man were a philanthropist or a villain, it was quite beyond my powers to determine.
It's a sort of fad of his to eat nothing but fish, and he's very proud of catching his own.
He was the fad of the hour, the adventurer who had stormed Parnassus while the gods nodded.
It is also true that the natives of the Solomons are a wild lot, with a hearty appetite for human flesh and a fad for collecting human heads.
He was quite willing to satisfy our curiosity, and in a few minutes we learned that the Streak had come in after dark from San Francisco; that this was what might be called the trial trip; and that she was the property of Silas Tate, a young mining millionaire of California, whose fad was high-speed yachts.
The zest for lyric poetry somewhat artificially inaugurated at Court by Wyatt and Surrey seems to have largely subsided, like any other fad, after some years, but it vigorously revived, in much more genuine fashion, with the taste for other imaginative forms of literature, in the last two decades of Elizabeth's reign.
On the contrary, he's as poor as a rat for his position, and apparently without the least ambition to be anything else; certainly he won't enrich himself by making a public fad of what all sensible people are agreed upon as it is.
He gave me some beautiful whiskey, and forgot all about his fad.
You see, I became the fashion, or a fad, in a small way.
A fad of his wife's, this, to have only women servants.
The FADs initiative is at the heart of the work by FAO and our partners to boost coastal livelihoods, strengthen resilience and tackle the underlying causes of piracy - Illegal fishing, degradation of local fisheries, high levels of youth unemployment, and food insecurity," said Richard Trenchard, FAO representative in Somalia.