Fads


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

Fads

Barbie doll
popular dress-up doll; extremely conventional and feminine. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 179]
Beatle cut
hairstyle with bangs, sides trimmed just below ears; banned by many school boards (1960s). [Am Hist.: Sann, 251–254]
bee-stung lips
ruby red and puckered female mouth make-up (1920s). [Am. Hist.: Griffith, 198]
bobbed hair
short, curly boyish hairstyle caused shock (1920s). [Am. Hist.: Griffith, 198]
bobby socks
female short socks that epitomized 1940s teen fashion. [Am. Cult.: Misc.]
car-stuffing
one example: 23 people stuffed in a Volkswagen bug. (1950s—1960s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 300]
chain letters
at height in 1930s, craze crippled postal service. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 97–104]
coonskin caps
raccoon cap with tail worn in recognition of Davy Crockett, Daniel Boone revival (1950s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 30]
flagpole sitting
sitting alone at the top of a flagpole; craze comes and goes. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 39–46]
frisbees
tossing plastic disks was favorite pastime, especially among collegians (1970s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 178]
gold fish-swallowing
collegiate craze in 1930s. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 289–292]
hip-flask
liquor bottle designed to fit into back pockets; indispensable commodity during Prohibition. [Am. Hist.: Allen, 70]
hula hoops
large plastic hoops revolved around body by hip action (1950s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 145–149]
Kewpie doll
designed by Rose O’Neill and modeled on her baby brother; millions were made (starting about 1910). [Am. Hist.: WB, 5: 240–241]
marathon dancing
dance contests, the longest of which lasted 24 weeks and 5 days (1930s). [Am. Hist.: McWhirter, 461]
marathon eating
contestants consume ridiculous quantities of food; craze comes and goes. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 77–78]
miniskirt
skirts hemmed at mid-thigh or higher; heyday of the leg in fashion world (1960s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 255–263]
mud baths
warm mud applied on skin supposedly to retain fresh, young complexion (1940s). [Am. Hist.: Griffith, 198]
panty raids
collegiate craze in the 1940s and 1950s. [Am. Hist.: Misc.]
raccoon coats
popular attire for collegians (1920s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 175]
rolled stockings
worn by flappers to achieve risque effect (1920s). [Am. Hist.: Griffith, 198]
saddle shoes
an oxford, usually white, with a saddle of contrasting color, usually brown; a favorite fad of the 1940s and 1950s. [Am. Pop. Culture: Misc.]
Silly Putty
synthetic clay; uses ranging from bouncing balls to false mustaches. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 165]
skateboards
mini surfboard supported on roller-skate wheels; 1960s craze enjoyed renaissance. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 151–152]
telephone booth-stuffing
bodies piled on top of one another inside a telephone booth; 1950s and 1960s craze. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 297]
tulipomania
tulip craze in Holland during which fortunes were lost. [Eur. Hist.: WB, 19: 394]
yo-yo
child’s toy that periodically overwhelms public’s fancy. [Am. Hist.: Sann, 173]
zoot suits
bizarre outfits with the “reet pleats” (1940s). [Am. Hist.: Sann, 275]
References in periodicals archive ?
The typical management fad or enthusiasm appears from almost nowhere, grows rapidly, peaks in five years, falls off just as rapidly, and 10 years from its birth has returned almost to zero," he says.
Apart from answering the most obvious questions many experienced administrators have about these fads (as, in my own case, "What ever happened to `Total Quality Management?
Analyses of these seven fads reveal many of the rationalizations used, the most frequent of which are lack of leadership, intransigence of followers, improper implementation, and lack of resources.
Of course, many fads that begin in a single age group broaden into others.
Philadelphia-based consumer trend expert Mona Doyle distinguishes between fads and trends by looking for evidence of consumer behaviors or intentions that cross many lines of behavior or many categories.
Fad words and phrases sweep through newsrooms with the regularity of the tides.
The longest and strongest of all fads to date is Management by Objectives (MBO).
history, and newspaper headlines--and not excluding intellectual fads and fashions (Wiarda 1985).
He says education resembles a progressive science less than it does the fashion and design industries, which gyrate according to fads and changing tastes.
The EPM Fad Study is based on original research into the history of more than 100 fads, and includes case studies for 74 American fads in the 20th Century.
The effort has been funded by the governments of Japan and Switzerland, while the European Union Naval Forces (EUNAVFOR) - which has a regional role in combatting piracy and monitoring fisheries - has provided critical protection and logistical support for the vessel that deployed the FADs.
Now that we know what they are, why are management fads so popular?