Fahrenheit 451


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Fahrenheit 451

describes a future America in which books are prohibited and burned. [Am. Lit.: Bradbury Fahrenheit 451 in Weiss, 289]

Fahrenheit 451

in an America of the future the fireman’s job is to burn all books that have been concealed from authorities. [Am. Lit.: Bradbury Fahrenheit 451 in Weiss, 289]
See: Fire

Fahrenheit 451

in a future America where books are prohibited, a group of people memorize texts in order to preserve their content. [Am. Lit.: Bradbury Fahrenheit 451 in Weiss, 289]
See: Memory
References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing on Ray Bradbury's 1953 science-fiction novel, Fahrenheit 451, the exhibition invites audiences into a fictional scenario in which the exhibited artworks will cease to exist and asks visitors to memorise the works to secure their future preservation.
It's a bit like Fahrenheit 451, only instead of burning books, the meaning of the word library has been physically changed.
Tonight will see a performance of 451, a fiery theatrical show inspired by Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451 novel.
A The War Of The Worlds B Nineteen Eighty-Four C Lord of the Flies D Fahrenheit 451 QUESTION 14 - for 14 points: In which sport might a Rudolph be performed?
Ray Bradbury typed up Fahrenheit 451 in the basement of the Powell Library at UCLA.
Ray Bradbury's novel Fahrenheit 451 once described an oppressive future, where a fireman whose duty is to destroy all books begins to question his task.
In fact, its closest cousins are films such as Logan's Run (1976) and Fahrenheit 451 (1966).
It must be acknowledged that the intrepid arsonists who burned the library may not have realised that the American science-fiction writer, Ray Bradbury, brilliantly depicted their reprehensible deed in Fahrenheit 451.
Le Guin's "impure" dystopias, totalitarian technocracies, the interplay of media culture, and conformism and commodification in Fahrenheit 451.
Ray Bradbury, author of novels Fahrenheit 451 and Something Wicked This Way Comes, died on Tuesday night in Southern California.
Fahrenheit 451, maybe co-incidentally, is also the temperature at which paper burns, an irony not lost on a generation of paper shuffling bureaucrats.
His novels The Martian Chronicles and Fahrenheit 451 are standard study fare for high-school students.