Fahrenheit Scale


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to Fahrenheit Scale: Celsius scale

Fahrenheit scale

[′far·ən‚hīt ‚skāl]
(thermodynamics)
A temperature scale; the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit (°F) is the sum of 32 plus ⁹⁄₅ the temperature in degrees Celsius; water at 1 atmosphere (101,325 pascals) pressure freezes very near 32°F and boils very near 212°F.

Fahrenheit Scale

 

a temperature scale in which the temperature range between the melting point of ice and the boiling point of water at standard atmospheric pressure is divided into 180 parts, called degrees Fahrenheit (°F). The melting point of ice is assigned a value of 32°F, and the boiling point of water is assigned a value of 212°F.

The Fahrenheit scale was proposed in 1724 by the German physicist D. G. Fahrenheit (1686–1736). It is traditionally used in a number of countries, particularly the USA.

The formula for converting a temperature on the Fahrenheit scale (tF) to a temperature on the Celsius scale (t) is the following: t = (5/9)(tF – 32°F).

Fahrenheit scale

A thermometric scale in which 32° denotes freezing and 212° the boiling point of water under normal pressure at sea level.
References in periodicals archive ?
Step 2: Add 32[degrees] to adjust for the offset in the Fahrenheit scale.
We've already had our old Fahrenheit scale fiddled with.
Nearly 300million Americans still use the Fahrenheit scale - just as they still think in miles, pounds and pints - and they always will.
Perhaps we'll only make it to 100 long after people have forgotten what the fahrenheit scale even means.