Fair Employment Practices Committee

Fair Employment Practices Committee

(FEPC), established (1941) within the Office of Production Management by executive order of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It was created to promote the fullest employment of all available persons and to eliminate discriminatory employment practices. President Truman advocated a permanent peacetime FEPC, but the Senate terminated the program in 1946. In 1964 the Equal Employment Opportunity CommissionEqual Employment Opportunity Commission
(EEOC), U.S. agency created in 1964 to end discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in employment and to promote programs to make equal employment opportunity a reality.
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 was created to fight discrimination in employment.

Bibliography

See J. K. Javits, Discrimination: U.S.A. (1960) P. Burstein, Discrimination, Jobs, and Politics (1985).

References in periodicals archive ?
In response to Randolph's call, FDR passed Executive Order 8802, creating the Fair Employment Practices Committee (FEPC), which sought to ban discrimination by defense contractors.
Clarence Mitchell, Jr (1911-1984) served on the US government's Fair Employment Practices Committee, established by President Franklin Roosevelt to curb racial discrimination in the defense industry, from 1942 to 1946, and later served as labor secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) and as director of the NAACP's Washington Bureau, where he played a key role in lobbying for landmark Civil Rights legislation between 1946 and 1954.
Bernstein notes that during World War II the Fair Employment Practices Committee (FEPC) was set up "in response to complaints of discrimination in public works and other federal projects" (p.
The FDR administration in 1935 did not support passage of an anti-lynching bill and the Fair Employment Practices Committee was not a legislatively approved commission but rather an ad hoc body resulting from President Roosevelt's Executive Order 8802.
After that failed, they joined conservative Republicans in Congress to kill Truman's social legislation, including a Fair Employment Practices Committee (not to mention a health care program).
One week later (and one week before the march was scheduled to take place), Roosevelt issued an executive order instructing federal agencies to administer their vocational and training programs without discrimination, and created the Fair Employment Practices Committee to enforce the order.