fall wind


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fall wind

[′fȯl ‚wind]
(meteorology)
A strong, cold, downslope wind, differing from a foehn in that the initially cold air remains relatively cold despite adiabatic warming upon descent, and from the gravity wind in that it is a larger-scale phenomenon prerequiring an accumulation of cold air at high elevations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fall winds can be variable, though, so if you can find two places on opposite sides of the food source, so much the better.
However, heavy heads of flowers, strong fall winds, soaking rains and weak stems can cause plants to fall.
Prevailing fall winds are usually from a westerly direction (at least where I hunt), so you'll have the wind at your back, which can work against you if you let deer linger out in front of you.
When they turn brown and break loose in the fall winds, they roll like giant beach balls, sometimes scattering their seeds for a mile or more.
The second reason to gaze skyward is to identify a good stand tree that will work in prevailing fall winds.