Fall of Constantinople


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Fall of Constantinople

associated with end of Middle Ages (1453). [Eur. Hist.: Bishop, 398]
References in classic literature ?
Many things besides the fall of Constantinople helped towards this New Birth.
The calamities gradually thickening round the Eastern Empire, and the fall of Constantinople, 1453 A.
With the fall of Constantinople, in 1453, the Turks blocked the way of the caravans to India.
Just as the fall of Constantinople in 1453 generated a wave of emigre Greek scholars who brought precious manuscripts that had fallen into obscurity in the West, regional tumult has led to a cross-fertilization of ideas in safe havens.
Drawing on two orations authored by Melanchthon--the first on the Sack of Rome on 1527, given soon after the news of it reached Wittenberg; and the second recalling the fall of Constantinople in 1453, given in May 1556--Martin Schneider considers Melanchthon's approach to history.
For example, the fall of Constantinople and the conquest of Spain where they were | | Every Saturday, the sender of our Letter of the Week receives a set of first day covers and a presentation pack courtesy of Royal Mail.
It covers the specifics of the fierce at-sea dueling that went on within the larger competition that spread over a sea claimed by both Byzantine Greek and Arab powers, anticipating by half a millennium the Ottoman conflict that would include both the fall of Constantinople and the ensuing battle of Lepanto.
The fall of Constantinople led to many of its glass makers fleeing to the small Venetian island of Murano.
The threat of the Turks dominated the period during which he wrote, and the fall of Constantinople in 1453 has been emphasized as an important factor in his advocacy of Roman civilization in this work, which he framed in the context of resistance to Turkish encroachment.
Set against the backdrop of the fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans, the largely through-composed opera--an innovation at the time--may have seemed timely to some with its clash of Muslim and Christian cultures and timeless to others through the richness of its bel canto vocal opportunities and sheer melodic invention.
Since the 15th century, Moscow has traditionally cast itself as the "third Rome" - tracing its succession down through the schism with the papacy in Rome, and then the fall of Constantinople, the "second Rome," to the Turks in 1453.
A look at the Orient: Renaissance masterpieces evoke the Ottoman Empire News of the fall of Constantinople on May 29, 1453, spread throughout Europe like wildfire.