false light


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false light

[¦fȯls ′līt]
(navigation)
A light which is unavoidably exhibited by an aid to navigation and which is not intended to be a part of the proper characteristic of the light, such as reflections from storm panes.
References in periodicals archive ?
That electricity was a false light was equally clear to Vladimir Lenin, who said in 1918 during a conversation with Leonid Krasin on the electrification of Russia, "Let the peasant pray to electricity.
Though false light and defamation claims are quite similar, the conduct actionable under this claim is not necessarily defamatory in nature, and courts finding a false statement or impression not defamatory are not precluded from imposing liability for false light.
The trial court dismissed Carpenter's claims based on "defamation, negligent infliction of emotional distress, and false light invasion of privacy.
Firstly, a person's right to identity is violated in the attributes of that person is used without permission in a way which cannot be reconciled with the true image of that person, similar to the false light publicity tort in the American law.
The first issue includes coverage of cases dealing with negligent hiring, slander, emotional distress, ERISA plans, false light claims, the use of company vehicles, and the extent of subcontractors liability.
in a false light by saying the company discriminates against people because of their race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, or handicap.
and the accompanying photographs put mountain lions in a false light.
We recognize that an over-emphasis on crime coverage would harm our community through portraying it in a false light of negativism.
Finally, your article presents LRP's conduct in a false light.
Traditionally, there have been four separate Rights of Privacy: the right to be free from intrusive invasion of privacy, the right to prevent public disclosure of private facts, the right not to be portrayed in a false light, and the right to prevent an invasion of your privacy by appropriation of your identity for commercial purposes.
The Colorado Court of Appeals on March 2 upheld a verdict that required the Denver Rocky Mountain News to pay $106,507 in damages for portraying a Denver man in a false light as a member of a crime-riddled family.
The furmans' yacht was situated on a public waterway and in view of any other boat on the water or people on the shore, yet he alleged that Sheppard intruded on his family's seclusion, placed them in false light and publicized private facts about them.