Famadihana

Famadihana

Between June and September
The Malagasy people of Madagascar, an island off the southeast coast of Africa, believe that their deceased ancestors have become intermediaries between the living and God. Because they will spend eternity in their new existence, tombs are built to be much sturdier and more elaborately decorated than houses. The Famadihana is a celebration in which people exhume the remains of their ancestors, treat them to a grand feast and party, replace their burial clothes, and then reintern them. The specific date of a family's Famidihana is determined by a spiritual leader, but, for hygenic reasons, it always takes place sometime during the winter months, when the weather is dry.
SOURCES:
FestWrld: Madag-1999, p. 14
References in periodicals archive ?
The ancient ritual of famadihana - or turning of the bones - involves locals in Madagascar removing loved ones from their graves before burying them again.
Neanmoins, on peut remarquer que les metis, a la generation suivante, parviennent pour la plupart a maintenir le lien avec le village ancestral ou a afficher leur identite malgache en pratiquant par exemple le famadihana (ceremonie de secondes funerailles) (Tisseau 2009).
The Merina and Betsileo reburial practice of famadihana, or "turning over the dead" celebrates this spiritual communion.
They also may invite a pastor to attend a famadihana.
and loaned himself a new dark suit for the famadihana.
From May to November, the winter months of Madagascar, people pull the remains of loved ones from their tombs and dance with the corpses in a ceremony known as famadihana, which literally means, "turning of bones.
24) : le famadihana, culte d'exhumation des morts a Madagascar pratique par la population Merina.
tenter de restituer les processus psychiques collectifs inconscients a l'oeuvre dans le famadihana, ce qui le rend efficace du point de vue des effets de l'inconscient, chez les participants >> (p.