Faraday cage


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Related to Faraday cage: Faraday shield

Faraday cage

[′far·ə‚dā ‚kāj]
(electricity)

Faraday cage

A shielded enclosure used to block electric fields from reaching its content. Constructed of metal, the cage conducts current on its exterior but prevents it from reaching inside. The Faraday cage was invented by physicist Michael Faraday in 1836.

Home-made cages are made by wrapping a cardboard box with aluminum foil or using metal garbage cans or anti-static bags. Items placed inside can also be wrapped with layers of aluminum foil. See EMP and Farad.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then their charge polarity and charge density were measured with a Faraday cage.
Inside the main building, hospitable astronomers took everybody down to their Faraday cage.
This whole set-up was mounted on a Zeiss IM 35 inverted microscope, in a Faraday cage, on an air table.
The iterative prototyping approach will be used in conjunction with the Faraday cage facility to rapidly build and test different corona emitter configurations.
Contract notice:Acquisition of a faraday cage with sound insulation for the optolysis platform of the physics laboratory
As well as using innovative techniques to optimise the circuit designs, new ultra-low power wireless protocols and patent-pending techniques make it possible to overcome the Faraday cage effect and transmit data through steel walls.
Along with the nickel-plated housing, this forms a conductive shell - or Faraday cage - around the electrical contacts to virtually eliminate electrical interference.
Solutions that appeal to so-called Faraday cage are used for electromagnetic shielding which means dressing your living or working space in a metal shell, usually made of wire mesh form, bound to earth.
Then the Professor seriously examines the feasibility of erecting a Faraday Cage around every exam room in the country to render such technology inactive' although, of course, she is much exercised by the question of what human rights issues this measure would raise and she agonises over how a teacher, invigilating an exam, might summon assistance in the event of an emergency, without a mobile phone.
Technologically, it would be relatively straightforward to stop mobile phones working, Professor Underwood said: "You put a Faraday Cage around the exam room.