Faraday cage

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Faraday cage

[′far·ə‚dā ‚kāj]
(electricity)

Faraday cage

A shielded enclosure used to block electric fields from reaching its content. Constructed of metal, the cage conducts current on its exterior but prevents it from reaching inside. The Faraday cage was invented by physicist Michael Faraday in 1836.

Home-made cages are made by wrapping a cardboard box with aluminum foil or using metal garbage cans or anti-static bags. Items placed inside can also be wrapped with layers of aluminum foil. See EMP and Farad.
References in periodicals archive ?
Full marks to the chap in Brighton who has covered the walls of his bar in tin foil to create a Faraday cage to block mobile phone signals.
The only thing we have in place now is PEP AM stations across the country where transmitters are housed in EMP-proof Faraday cages with thousands of gallons of fuel underground to power them for weeks.
Developing quantum computers requires specific conditions and it has been reportedly alleged that the agency carries out some of its research in large, shielded rooms known as Faraday cages, which are designed to prevent electromagnetic energy from coming in or out.
With talk about the potential event of a large solar flare directly hitting Earth, some high-tech engineering types are discussing the merits of using homemade Faraday cages to protect electronics and power-generating equipment and vehicle computers.
Faraday cages have almost ideal performance for electrostatic fields, work very well for electromagnetic fields but with some qualifications, and have little effect on low-frequency magnetic fields.