Fas protein

Fas protein

[¦ef¦ā′es ‚prō‚tēn]
(cell and molecular biology)
A cell-surface protein receptor expressed on essentially all cells of the body that when bound to its ligand (FasL) signals a caspase cascade, ultimately resulting in apoptosis (programmed cell death).
References in periodicals archive ?
Pursuing that possibility, their experiments would piece together the pathway of the genes to discover that the lupus mice had a malfunctioning Fas protein that prevented their bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from releasing a molecule needed for normal differentiation/bone formation.
Treating the 3T3-L1 cells with 15 [mico]g/ml 6-gingerol decreased the FAS protein levels by 26.
Moreover, additional studies revealed that FAS protein expression was three times higher in uterine fibroid samples compared to normal myometrial tissue (muscle tissue that forms the uterine wall).
To further investigate the potential role of ficolins in the preeclamptic trophoblasts, we demonstrated the strong expression of apoptotic protein marker Fas protein, and also the coexpression of both ficolins and Fas in the syncytiotrophoblasts from established preeclamptic pregnancies (n = 5; Fig.
After the confirmation of the activated caspase-3, a marker of apoptosis development, and the elevated levels of active caspase-8 and Fas protein, we did not observe increased levels of active caspase-9 or released cytochrome c in SHS-exposed rat hearts.
Sure enough, the genetically engineered mice appeared to manufacture healthy amounts of the normal Fas protein.
Many liver diseases are characterized by apoptosis, which is mediated by the Fas protein.
Using the ARIAD system, it may be possible to genetically modify the cancer-fighting cells so that they produce a FAS protein that responds to an ARIAD small-molecule drug.
However, after 24 h [beta]-sitosterol supplementation of MCF-7 cells, there was a 30% increase in Fas protein level compared to MCF-7 cells supplemented with cholesterol or CD vehicle control (Fig.
When Fas proteins are activated, they in turn activate and mobilize other protein families involved in apoptosis, such as the Bcl-2 family.