fauvism

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fauvism

(fō`vĭzəm) [Fr. fauve=wild beast], name derisively hurled at and cheerfully adopted by a group of French painters, including Matisse, Rouault, Derain, Vlaminck, Friesz, Marquet, van Dongen, Braque, and Dufy. Although fauvism was a short-lived movement (1905–8), its influence was international and basic to the evolution of 20th-century art. It was essentially an expressionist style, characterized by bold distortion of forms and exuberant color. Only Matisse continued to explore its possibilities after 1908. Most of the others contributed to the development of new styles, such as cubismcubism,
art movement, primarily in painting, originating in Paris c.1907. Cubist Theory

Cubism began as an intellectual revolt against the artistic expression of previous eras.
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, which immediately followed the fauvist movement.

Bibliography

See J. P. Crespelle, The Fauves (tr. 1962); J. É. Muller, Fauvism (1967); S. Whitfield, Fauvism (1990).

Fauvism

 

an avant-garde movement in French painting of the early 20th century. The ironic epithet les fauves (“the wild beasts”) was given by critics to a group of painters including H. Matisse, P.-A. Marquet, G. Rouault, M. de Vlaminck, A. Derain, R. Dufy, G. Braque, and K. van Dongen, who exhibited their works at the Salon d’Automne in Paris in 1905.

In contrast to German expressionism, fauvism had neither a consciously adopted program nor a moral or philosophical orientation, but rather represented a purely aesthetic protest against 19th-century artistic traditions and an affirmation of an independent new outlook on painting. The fauves, who painted in various styles, were united for a short period, from 1905 to 1907, by their attraction to terse graphic forms, intense color contrasts, pronounced compositional rhythms, and a decorative and laconic technique, as well as a search for new inspiration in primitive, medieval, and Oriental art.

REFERENCES

Leymarie, J. Le Fauvisme. [Geneva, 1959.]
Muller, J.-E. Le Fauvisme. Paris [1967].
Diehl, G. The Fauves. New York, 1975.
Oppler, E. C. Fauvism Reexamined. New York, 1976.
References in periodicals archive ?
The involvement of modernists groups such as the Fauvists, Cubists and German Expressionists with art negre helped establish the later 'cult of the primitive' in the context of the Surrealist movement.
He painted intently, disregarding all the topical trends (the Nabis, Pointillists, Fauvists, Cubists), and declared to his astonished contemporaries, "The subject is not important to me; what I want to reproduce is what exists between the subject and me.
In more modern terms, his work recalls the fauvists, the French avant-garde movement of the early 20th century, and their spontaneous expressions in potent color used directly from the tube.
With sunshine virtually guaranteed, we looked south, eventually shunning the often crowded Cote D'Azur for the more sedate pleasures of Roussillon and the stunning Cote Vermeille - a beautiful stretch of coast which hugs the Spanish border and inspired 19th-century Fauvists including acclaimed French artist Henri Matisse.
Even when taking into account the historic achievements of both Der Blaue Reiter (Kandinsky and Company) and Die Brucke (founded by Kirchner, Karl Schmidt-Rotluff, and Erich Heckel), it seems fair to say that the greater glory of that moment was captured by the French: by Matisse and the Fauvists, by Picasso and the Cubists.