Fearsomeness


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Fearsomeness

Deimos
attendant of Ares; personification of fear. [Gk. Myth.: Howe, 77]
Dracula
eerie tale of vampires and werewolves. [Br. Lit.: Dracula]
Invasion from Mars
Orson Welles’s broadcast; terrified a credulous America (1938). [Am. Hist.: Van Doren, 468]
Iroquois
strongest, most feared of eastern confederacies. [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 250]
Jaggers, Mr.
lawyer esteemed and feared by clients. [Br. Lit.: Great Expectations]
Ko-Ko
holder of dread office of High Executioner. [Br. Opera: The Mikado, Magill I, 591–592]
Native Son
portrays oppressor and oppressed as both filled with fear. [Am. Lit.: Native Son, Magill I, 643–645]
Phobus
god of dread and alarm. [Gk. Myth.: Kravitz, 14, 84]
Seven That Were Hanged, The
analyzes the fears of an official threatened with assassination and of seven condemned prisoners. [Russ. Lit.: Magill II, 957]
Shere Khan
lame tiger who wants to devour Mowgli; causes fear throughout story. [Children’s Lit.: The Jungle Book]
References in periodicals archive ?
This means that, in principle, DAF is subject to the Wrong Kind of Reasons Problem, for it remains open, in principle, that we could generate a case that provides a consideration that bears on desert while obviously not bearing on, say, admirableness (or fearsomeness or blameworthiness, etc.
Much has been written lately about the deliberately fostered "culture of fear" in the contemporary United States: I suggest that beliefs about the fearsomeness of "masterless men" in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries also created a "culture of fear," and that those who played up the perils of homeless people had--as they now have--a clear right-wing agenda.
I've had dozens of Sontag dreams, in which she represents intellectuality's phantasmagoria, prose's succulence, quality's fearsomeness, and aphorism's bite.
4) This traveller's unsupported suspicion of Khoikhoi cannibalism derived, first, from the undoubted fearsomeness of the Hottentots when the Europeans offended them: fifty to sixty-five Spaniards were slaughtered during the voyage of Francisco d'Almeida in 1510, and thereafter pockets of Europeans were sometimes killed, often for reasons not easy to determine (see Raven-Hart, 1967: 9-11).
Wagner called the grim trumpet blasts and subsequent eerie growling at the beginning of the final movement, intrudes and recalls the divine fearsomeness that used to cow the multitudes; but the tremulous prostration of the bad old days has evolved into the modern liberal faith, so that even on his knees a man remains upright.
He evokes an older and more robust tradition involving the fearsomeness of these "powers and dominions" from a realm higher than the human.
53) From its very beginning and during its early history, Fang Xiang Shi's mask was marked by its ugly appearance, its fearsomeness, and its severe features.
Bourgois's heroes thrive on risk and self-indulgence, on "getting over," on hoodwinking the police, the courts, and the welfare system alike, on serial polygamy in an effort to father as many children as possible, and especially on systematic as well as random, often gratuitous, violence that keeps others off guard and heightens one's fearsomeness.
To maximize its fearsomeness, despotic power seeks to isolate every individual from everyone else.
On the other hand, the very fearsomeness of the new threat was invoked to prevent its being carried out.
Why did she not attribute to adults the warmth she experienced from her mother rather than the fearsomeness of her father's anger?
There is a nearness of Melanesians to the violence and fearsomeness of death in 'Uneasy stares' (Kirk 1972:376-7) that dwells on the "grim, heavily armed warriors [who] are members of a raiding party intent on taking heads," and on the "Grisly relic" (Kirk 1973:374) trophy of the head-hunter.