Dysphagia

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dysphagia

[dis′fā·jə]
(medicine)
Difficulty in swallowing, or inability to swallow, of organic or psychic causation.

Dysphagia

 

difficulty in the act of swallowing.

The causes of dysphagia are inflammations of the oral cavity, pharynx, esophagus, larynx, and mediastinum; foreign bodies; cicatricial stenoses and tumors; and certain nervous conditions. Swallowing is difficult or impossible and painful. Food or liquid get into the nose, larynx, and trachea. Dysphagia is treated by eliminating the primary condition.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although full-term and preterm infants did not demonstrate significant differences in feeding difficulties at their first oral feeding, by the time solid foods were introduced, preterm children were more likely to demonstrate feeding difficulties (Burklow, McGrath, Valerius, & Rudolph, 2002).
She has attained her previous weight percentile, maintaining normal growth without any feeding difficulties for a follow-up period of 1 year.
However, other children experience feeding difficulties that may not result in obvious functional limitations.
In newborns, feeding difficulties present with refusal of milk and difficulty with sucking or swallowing, or discomfort during a feed.
When a child with autism comes to my clinic for feeding difficulties, I look at a variety of issues:
In babies with bronchiolitis, it is important to be vigilant and seek medical advice early if there are concerns about worsening breathing and feeding difficulties.
Symptoms include brittle hair, feeding difficulties, irritability, lack of muscle tone and floppiness (hypotonia), low body temperature, mental deterioration, rosy cheeks, seizures, skeletal changes.
Gabbidon took over as skipper when Hammers team-mate Bellamy, pictured right, pulled out after his five-day-old daughter developed feeding difficulties, and was keen to provide his absent captain with a much-needed tonic.
Bellers withdrew from the Wales squad at the 11th hour yesterday, admitting he was not in the 'right frame of mind' as his five-day-old daughter is suffering feeding difficulties.
The new rules allow movement of up to one kilometre under licence to accommodate the needs of newly weaned animals, pregnant sows and cows, animals for breeding; and animals with feeding difficulties as a result of a severe shortage of grazing.