Felix Faust


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Felix Faust

(pop culture)
Sorcerer Felix Faust has DC Comics' greatest superheroes at his fingertips in Justice League of America #10 (1962). Via finger puppets in the shapes of the JLA members, Faust, who exploits the black arts through incantations learned from the occult bible the Necronomicon, persuades the JLA to unearth three artifacts that will grant him governance over the omnipotent demons Abnegazar, Rath, and Ghast. With the Leaguers held motionless by magic spells, Aquaman—commonly regarded as the most useless Justice Leaguer due to his water-dependent superpowers—thwarts Faust's plans by telepathically directing flying fish to kayo the conjurer. Justice League writer Gardner Fox sampled from a literary cauldron for that tale. Felix Faust idolized his namesake, who “sold his soul to the devil for supernatural powers,” a reference to the fifteenth-century fortune teller Faust, whose excursions through Germany earned him a reputation as an actual theurgist and inspired several narratives (including Johann Wolfgang von Goethe's 1808 poem Faust). Legendary horror-fiction scribe H. P. Lovecraft, at one time represented by JLA editor Julius Schwartz during Schwartz's pre-comics days as a sci-fi agent, is alluded to in Fox's script in connection to the Necronomicon, which appeared in Lovecraft's works. Writers expanded Felix Faust's backstory in subsequent stories. In 5,000 BC in the African nation of Kor, Faust battled the benevolent wizard Nommo—aka Dr. Mist—for control of the arcane power of the Flame of Life. Exiled into another dimension, he was eventually freed in the twentieth century. Faust has negotiated deals with demons for numinous power and immortality, selling the soul of his son Sebastian (who at one time fought with the Outsiders as the superhero Faust). Felix's reliance upon otherworldly forces and tomes always proves his downfall. Felix Faust has battled with many of DC's supernatural heroes and has partnered with other rogues, including the Secret Society of Super-Villains. His oddest roles include a position on a villains baseball team in DC Super-Stars #10 (1976) and a brief stint as a librarian. After discovering that many of their memories had been “mindwiped” (erased) by the superhero magician Zatanna, Faust and several resentful former members of the Secret Society reunited in 2005 to attack the Justice League. Robert Englund, best known as cinema's Freddy Krueger, has voiced Faust on the Cartoon Network's Justice League (2001–2004) and Justice League Unlimited (2004–present).