fellow

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fellow

1. (at Oxford and Cambridge universities) a member of the governing body of a college, who is usually a member of the teaching staff
2. a member of the governing body or established teaching staff at any of various universities or colleges
3. a postgraduate student employed, esp for a fixed period, to undertake research and, often, to do some teaching

Fellow

a member of any of various learned societies
References in classic literature ?
In the way of literary talk, it is true, the Naval Officer -- an excellent fellow, who came into the office with me, and went out only a little later -- would often engage me in a discussion about one or the other of his favourite topics, Napoleon or Shakespeare.
No; I mean, really, Tom is a good, steady, sensible, pious fellow.
Strike a light instantly,'' said the Captain; ``I will examine this said purse; and if it be as this fellow says, the Jew's bounty is little less miraculous than the stream which relieved his fathers in the wilderness.
We can imagine the start of surprise felt by each of these bold fellows upon seeing the other in such strange company.
On the second day after the wounding of Black Michael, Clayton came on deck just in time to see the limp body of one of the crew being carried below by four of his fellows while the first mate, a heavy belaying pin in his hand, stood glowering at the little party of sullen sailors.
You stumped up your money for nothing, and we believe in those fellows, here
But sad news it is indeed, gin there be two stout fellows in the stocks.
You just wait a moment, my dear fellow, and listen," interrupted the staff captain in his deep bass, calmly stroking his long mustache.
I guess it might be easier that way than to tackle one of these fellows in the street where there is more chance of our being interrupted.
You mustn't make fun of him, for he's a good old fellow, and you'd be just as ugly if your flesh was off," said Rose, defending her new friend with warmth.
It was the good fellows, easy and genial, daring, and, on occasion, mad, that I wanted to know--the fellows, generous-hearted and -handed, and not rabbit-hearted.
Our youth, now, emboldened with his success, resolved to push the matter farther, and ventured even to beg her recommendation of him to her father's service; protesting that he thought him one of the honestest fellows in the country, and extremely well qualified for the place of a gamekeeper, which luckily then happened to be vacant.