Ferlinghetti


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Ferlinghetti

Lawrence. born 1920, US poet of the Beat Generation. His poetry includes the collections Pictures of the Gone World (1955) and When I Look at Pictures (1990)
References in periodicals archive ?
Head down to listen and discuss performances from US Beats such as Ginsberg, Ferlinghetti and Burroughs, as well as some of their British followers.
Yet this was precisely the moment when Lawrence Ferlinghetti and other poet-painters on the West Coast began to flourish.
Who could conceive of the Beat Generation-Ginsberg, Kerouac, Ferlinghetti, Rexroth, Corso, Burroughs, Diane di Prima and Anne Waldman, et.
Those familiar with Hemingway, Kerouac, Ferlinghetti, Dylan and Ginsberg will enjoy the 'Beat' flavor of the poetry in this book as well as some of the more simple, straightforward attacks on our hearts and our senses.
I am a tear of the sun": Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Autobiography
Di Prima follows Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Janice Mirikitani, devorah major, and Jack Hirschman.
There's a good chance you'll see owner-poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti there; he's in his 90s now and keeps a low profile.
Though Ferlinghetti does not name a particular painting, The Third of May, 1808 would be a good example because it depicts the execution of Madrid citizens by French soldiers.
As precursors of the 1960s "hippies," the Beats, including Italian Americans Lawrence Ferlinghetti (born 1919), Gregory Corso (born 1930, died 2001), Diane di Prima (born 1934), and Philip Lamantia (born 1927, died 2005), fused art and politics to raise political consciousness about post-war America.
Then I had other Americans agree to sign on: Archibald MacLeish, Allen Ginsberg, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Kenneth Rexroth, Robert Bly, Muriel Rukeyser, Arthur Miller, Rose Styron, Robert Hass, Roger Straus, John Laughlin, Joan Baez, Pete Seeger, Malvina Reynolds.
As his friend, poet Lawrence Ferlinghetti, never tired of saying, he was the best bookseller in the world.
34) The complainants noted problems with broadcasts, labeling them as "offensive [and] 'filthy," (35) that involved poetry readings by Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Edward Albee's play The Zoo Story, a passage from Edward Pomerantz's novel, The Kid, a program entitled, Live and Let Live during "which eight homosexuals discussed their attitudes and problems," and a poetry reading by author Robert Creeley dubbed, "Ballad of the Despairing Husband.