Ferragus

Ferragus

the Portuguese giant who took the empress Bellisant under his care. [Br. Lit.: “Valentine and Orson” in Brewer Handbook, 364]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In the preface to Ferragus (1833), which introduces the story of the Treize, Balzac insistently describes his band of men through references to fiction: though they have led a "vie secrete, curieuse, autant que peut l'Etre le plus noir des romans," he writes, "ces treize hommes sont restes inconnus, quoique tous aient realise les plus bizarres idees que suggere a l'imagination la fantastique puissance faussement attribuee aux Manfred, aux Faust, aux Melmoth" (5: 787-88).
L'armada di Franz Zeise (1947), Ferragus di Balzac (1947), Saffo di
La mujer burguesa y pequeno burguesa es objeto de la mirada ansiosa y escrutadora de la ideologia patriarcal en Ferragus, jefe de los devorantes, de Balzac, donde el narrador nos ofrece incluso las conjeturas que un prototipico observador masculino, imbuido de la moral burguesa, estableceria en el caso de llegar a escrutar la llegada de una mujer burguesa a calles y casas ajenas a las frecuentadas por el 'mundo respetable':
He pulled a quote that Maurice had cited from Balzac's Ferragus for use in his article "Paris in Ut-Mineur," which he published on March 8, 1931 in the Paris edition of the Chicago Tribune--under the byline of Alfred Perles.
Turning in the next section of the book to Balzac, Nesci uses the contrasting heroines of Ferragus, Ida Gruget and Clemence Desmarets as a means of exploring Balzac's modern aesthetic, which she sees as linked to the depiction of a haunted and haunting Paris which is decidedly gendered.
Sabido es que efectos tan conmovedores, misteriosos y terribles saco de este punto de partida en Ferragus, La duquesa de Langeais y La joven de los ojos de oro; pero la vida real y la vida intelectual no se desligaban una de otra por completo en Balzac como en ciertos autores, y sus creaciones le seguian fuera de su gabinete de estudio.
It is not, however, to the Scenes de la vie de province that one would most naturally turn in illustration of such a view of the Balzacian text but to the openings of, say, Le Pere Goriot, Ferragus, or La Fille aux yeux d'or to confine oneself to texts from the same period as La Vieille Fille.
Balzac's 1833 novel Ferragus exemplifies on several levels this problem of readability, by which I mean the ability to decipher and interpret, and to produce a coherent meaning.
His thesis is based on a dose examination of the works of Stendhal and Balzac, notably La Chartreuse de Parme and to a lesser extent Lucien Leuwen, and Ferragus, Gambara and La Peau de chagrin, with brief reference also to Le P&re Goriot.
In Valentine and Orson, a gigantic head kept in the castle of the giant Ferragus of Portugal tells those who consult it whatever they require to know, past, present, or to come.