Fichtelgebirge


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Fichtelgebirge

(fĭkh`təlgəbĭr'gə), mountain knot, in SE Germany, between Bayreuth and the Czech border; rises to 3,447 ft (1,051 m) in Schneeberg peak. The rugged mountains are composed mainly of metamorphic rock. The Erzgebirge, Bohemian Forest, Thuringian Forest, and Franconian Jura radiate from them, and the Saale and Main rivers originate there. The Fichtelgebirge have dense pine forests and are dotted with resorts. The mountains were once rich in a variety of minerals, but now only lignite and iron are found in large quantities. Selb, the chief town of the region, is a major center for porcelain production. Other major industries include cotton textiles, forestry, granite quarrying, and tourism.

Fichtelgebirge

 

a mountain massif in the Federal Republic of Germany. The Fichtelgebirge extend for more than 50 km and form the western tip of the Bohemian Massif. They are composed primarily of schists, which form a plateau at an elevation of approximately 600 m; above this plateau rise rocky granite and gneiss peaks, which rise to an elevation of 1,053 m, at the Schneeberg. Rock streams are found along the slopes. The massif is covered by fir forests and meadows. The population is engaged in cattle raising and the cultivation of rye and potatoes. The Fichtelgebirge are a center for tourism and winter sports.

References in periodicals archive ?
Major organization : LANDKREIS WUNSIEDEL IM FICHTELGEBIRGE
In these forests, as at Fichtelgebirge, acidic pollutants initiated nutrient imbalances that have weakened the trees to the point where all it takes to finish them off are insects, fungal infections or such vicissitudes of weather as heat, drought and ice storms, he suggests.
His field studies, for example, showed that needles on trees in the declining Fichtelgebirge stands -- exposed to substantial sulfur dioxide, smog ozone and nitrogen oxides -- photosynthesize at the same rate as healthy spruce needles growing in the pristine air of Craigiburn, New Zealand.
Compounding the problem is an unusual abundance of soil ammonium at Fichtelgebirge, according to Schulze's new data.
Imagine Schulze's shock, then, when he learned last year that much of the nitrate raining down on the upper forested slopes in Germany's Fichtelgebirge -- a range of mountains within 25 miles of the Czech border -- is not taken up by trees or nitrogen-hungry microbes in the soil.
The Germans found that 16 to 20 percent of the nitrate leaving two healthy-looking Fichtelgebirge stands bore air pollution's signature, they report in the Dec.
Verhoeven W, Herrmann R, Eiden R, Kelmm O (1987) A comparison of the chemical composition of fog and rainwater collected in the Fichtelgebirge, Federal Republic of Germany and from the South Island of New Zealand.
Implementing agency : Landratsamts Wunsiedel im Fichtelgebirge