fifth-generation computer

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fifth-generation computer

[′fifth ‚jen·ə¦rā·shən kəm′pyüd·ər]
(computer science)
A computer that would use artificial intelligence techniques to learn, reason, and converse in natural languages resembling human languages.

fifth-generation computer

A computer that exhibits artificial intelligence (AI). We are entering the fifth generation. See computer generations, AI and Turing test.
References in periodicals archive ?
National projects, including: ICOT--the laboratory of the Japanese Fifth Generation Computer Project; EDR--the electronic dictionary research knowledge-based building effort; LIFE--the Laboratory for International Fuzzy Engineering.
Five years ago, we lived in fear of the Japanese Fifth Generation Computer Project.
The decade-long Fifth Generation Computer Systems (FGCS) project ended last June with mixed feelings about its outcome.
We conclude this special section with a short epilogue which briefly assesses the material presented in the articles and offers some general assessments of the Fifth Generation Computer Systems project.
The Role of Logic Programming in the Fifth Generation Computer Project.
In Proceedings of the International Conference on the Fifth Generation Computer Systems 1981 (Tokyo, 1981).
These projects were initially launched to compete with the Fifth Generation Computer Systems Project.
In Proceedings of the International Conference on Fifth Generation Computer Systems.
When the Japanese Fifth Generation Computer project was launched in the early 1980s, data-processing professionals along with the world press were quick to appreciate the strategic goals and background ideas of the project which has since been referred to as "Japan's challenge.
May 10 3rd International Conference on Fifth Generation Computer Systems, Tokyo, Japan.
Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry wants to spend two more years and a few more million dollars on its fifth generation computers.
Besides producing images and crunching numbers, Fifth Generation computers will talk to their operators and follow spoken commands.