FEA

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FEA

finite element analysis

FEA

Abbr. for “Federal Energy Administration.”

FEA

(Finite Element Analysis) A mathematical technique for analyzing stress, which breaks down a physical structure into substructures called "finite elements." The finite elements and their interrelationships are converted into equation form and solved mathematically.

Graphics-based FEA software can display the model on screen as it is being built and, after analysis, display the object's reactions under load conditions. Models created in popular CAD packages can often be accepted by FEA software. See automatic design optimization.
References in periodicals archive ?
For undergraduate electrical engineering students, Cardoso explains the finite element method for solving dedicated electromagnetic problems based on the basic laws of electromagnetics, without using sophisticated mathematical resources.
The following three sections of the book present a more detailed development of the finite element method, then progress through the boundary element method, and end with meshless methods.
Both models' approximation uses rod-type finite element BEAM188 of ANSYS program elements library.
Keywords: Finite Element Method, Direct Stiffness Method, Structural Analysis, Two Dimensional Truss Analysis.
All articles related to the application of 3D finite element in orthodontics were collected.
The finite element model of the examined structure is composed of finite elements of several types: plane (triangular or quadrangular) and connective quadrangular prismatic finite elements.
The programs are based on the analytical calculation method and finite element method (FEM), Figure 1.
The finite element method (FEM) has been used for five decades for numerical stress analysis (Faur, 2002).
of Minnesota) introduces a common framework for the Control Volume Finite Element Method (CVFEM) solution, which combines the physics of Control Volume Methods with the geometric flexibility of Finite Element Methods, so that it can be applied to the solution of equations related to the behavior of both fluids and solids.
If the recovered gradient approximates the exact gradient better than the gradient computed directly by using the finite element solution, the comparison gives an a posteriori error estimator.
Driven by the need to further understand this complicated field of mechanics, a finite element analysis (FEA) method was applied to analyze indentation processes.
The second FEMCI Workshop on Innovative Finite Element Modeling Solutions to Challenging Problems will be held May 16 and 17 at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD.

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