Finnmark


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Finnmark

(fĭn`märk), county (1995 pop. 76,668), 18,783 sq mi (46,648 sq km), N Norway, bordering on the Arctic Ocean in the north, on the Barents Sea in the east, on Russia in the southeast, and on Finland in the south. It forms the northernmost part of the Scandinavian peninsula and is the largest—but least populated—county of Norway. The main towns are Vadsø (the capital) and Hammerfest. Its coast is deeply indented by large fjords, notably the Tanafjord and the Varangerfjord. There are numerous islands off the coast; on one of them is North Cape. The population consists largely of Sami (Lapps) and Finns. Fishing, reindeer raising, farming, and mining are the chief occupations. There are large iron mines near Kirkenes and rich mineral deposits in the Kautokeino region. Finnmark was severely damaged (1944) by the Germans in World War II.

Finnmark

a county of N Norway: the largest, northernmost, and least populated county; mostly a barren plateau. Capital: Vads?. Pop.: 73 210 (2004 est.). Area: 48 649 sq. km (18 779 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Building of the power line from Reisadalen to Skillemoen is related to the strategic programme for ensuring security of power supply in Finnmark.
Finnmark county has been a powerbroker in the efforts, and continues to upgrade infrastructure necessary for removing a half-century's worth of Soviet nuclear junk.
Historically, Finnmark has had a large-scale fish and reindeer industry, but today there is emphasis on, and profit in, the tourist and service industries and trade.
Our rooftop hot tub was at the Thon Vica hotel in Alta, the capital of Norway's northernmost Finnmark region.
I had wandered outside the Alto Igloo ice hotel - in Finnmark, Norway's northernmost county - and they started their incredible light show.
There is a wholesome eeriness to Finnmark ( a romance ( especially in mid-winter when perpetual darkness swallows the land.
Further information about Finnmark is available at www.
They introduce the laws of navigational and non-navigational use of international watercourses, the rights of indigenous people (using the Saami of Lapland and Finnmark as an example) northern European cooperation and watercourse institutions, and Nordic watercourse cooperation and the sustainable use of water.
This month, there seems to be a slightly heavier bias than usual towards animal stories: we have the cover feature about the leopards of Sanjay Ghandi National Park in Mumbai, which are attacking the local human population (page 42); there are the wild Bactrian camels in China's Lop Nur Wild Camel National Nature Reserve, which are suffering from the effects of illegal gold extraction using potassium cyanide (page 14); and there are the reindeer of the extreme north of Norway which, with the guidance of Sami herdsman, make their annual migration across the frozen wastes of Finnmark to fresh feeding grounds (page 58).
The Committee is concerned that the recently proposed Finnmark Act will significantly restrict the control and decision-making powers of the Saami population over the right to own and use land and natural resources in the Finnmark County.
The bottle was found by a couple on a beach in Finnmark, northern Norway, in 1978.
The aircraft crashed in Norway's Arctic province of Finnmark, killing 15 people.