fjord

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fjord

or

fiord

(fyôrd), steep-sided inlet of the sea characteristic of glaciated regions. Fjords probably resulted from the scouring by glaciers of valleys formed by any of several processes, including faulting and erosion by running water. When the regions occupied by these glaciers subsided, the valleys were drowned by the sea. The fjord coast lines of Norway, Scotland, Greenland, Alaska, British Columbia, S Chile, S New Zealand, and Antarctica are examples. A fjord differs from most estuaries in its sheer, parallel walls, often extending far below the water surface, and in its many branches of similar form. Often shallow at the mouth, fjords are frequently very deep farther inland. Sognafjord (Norway) is 4,000 ft (1,220 m) deep and over 100 mi (160 km) long. Loch Moran, Scotland (1,017 ft/310 m), is a typical fjord but is separated from the sea. Norwegian fjords are noted for their grandeur.

Fjord

 

a narrow, winding, deep inlet in a mountainous coast. Its length is often dozens of times greater than its width. The sides of fjords are steep, even vertical, becoming less steep in the upper walls; the floor is highly irregular. The longest known fjord, Sognafjorden, is 204 km long, 1.5–6 km wide, and up to 1,208 m deep. Fjords are often separated from the open sea by a sill. They represent ancient erosion or tectonic valleys that underwent scouring by mountain glaciers, which deepened the floor, and that were subsequently inundated by postglacial transgression. Fjords are found only at high latitudes where Pleistocene glaciers formed or modern glaciers exist; they are found on the coasts of Norway, Spitsbergen, Greenland, the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, Novaia Zemlia, Taimyr, the Chukchi Peninsula, New Zealand, and Patagonia.

fjord

[fyȯrd]
(geography)
A narrow, deep inlet of the sea between high cliffs or steep slopes. Also spelled fiord.

fjord

, fiord
(esp on the coast of Norway) a long narrow inlet of the sea between high steep cliffs formed by glacial action
References in periodicals archive ?
Mountains rise to about 2,000 meters along the edge, giving rise to a series of fiords that have earned the peninsula the title of the 'Norway of the Middle East'.
New Zealand Greenshell Mussels have been cultivated on loglines nestled in the idyllic fiords and remote coastlines of New Zealand," says Marco M Kouch, category meat and seafood manager, Horeca Trade LLC.
In past years, retailers such as fiords from, Henri Bendel, Bergdorf Goodman, Sephora, QVC and HSN have secured partnerships with Discover Beauty brands and this year will continue in the same vein.
I loved using the running machine watching the fiords go past as we sailed out of Oslo, or the little islands of the archipelago as we steamed in to Turku, the pretty former capital of Finland.
Chilean "mitiliculture" has been mainly developed on mass culture of Mytilus chilensis from natural banks of Los Lagos Region, Reloncavi Bay, Reloncavi Fiords and around Chiloe Island (39[degrees]15' S-44[degrees]04'S).
The spectacular coastline is richly hued, dotted with islands and fiords that were once all land-based mountains and rivers.
000 years ago, and retreating glaciers created a mosaic landscape of countless islands, bays and fiords in which new species developed rapidly - geologically speaking.
The difference in costs is in the pilots, tugs, signalling and other adjacent services which cruise vessels must pay while sailing along the Chilean fiords.
30) John Hall-Jones, Doubtfull Harbour, 1984 and 1988 supplement; idem, The Fiords of Fiordland, Craig Printing, Invercargill, 2002.
The scientists investigated this unexplored mechanism by using mesh traps to collect particles of marine snow sinking in Clayoquot Sound off Vancouver, Canada, where fiords extend into the ocean.
Tsunami of more local extent, triggered by landslides and shallow crustal earthquakes, also pose a hazard to Canada's west coast, especially in steep-walled fiords and inlets that indent the coast (Clague 2001).