Firewood


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Firewood

 

sawn and usually split trees intended for use as fuel. In the USSR it is customary to measure firewood by volume, for which purpose it is stacked in piles, the value (wood content) of which depends on the way it is stacked: the stacking is considered normal if the firewood totals 70 percent of the volume. The mass of 1 cubic meter (with wood occupying 100 percent of the volume) with a relative moisture content of 20 percent weighs approximately 730 kg for oak, 670 kg for birch, 525 kg for pine, 470 kg for fir, and 500 kg for aspen. The wood of all species of trees in the USSR has a similar chemical composition and contains about 50 percent carbon. Hence the heat of combustion of wood of various species in absolutely dry condition in terms of 1 kilogram is the same: about 18,800 kilojoules (4,500 kcal), with a variation of not more than 3 to 5 percent. However, the heat of combustion of wood per cubic decimeter is different and is on the average, in kilojoules (kcals), 12,500 (3,000) for oak, 10,900 (2,600) for birch, 8,400 (2,000) for black alder, 7,500 (1,800) for pine, and 7,100 (1,700) for fir and aspen. In terms of heat of combustion 100 kg of dry wood corresponds to 31 kg of oil residues, 43 kg of coal, 50 kg of dry peat, and 120 kg of semidry peat. The proportion of wood in the fuel balance of the USSR is negligible and steadily diminishing.

References in classic literature ?
It availed me nothing that I piled the blaze high with firewood, until Ajor and I were near to roasting; on came that mighty engine of destruction until once again the hideous face yawned its fanged yawn directly within the barrier's opening.
Once at the tree, he studied the surrounding forest in order to fell the tree in the direction of the most firewood.
This unique adjuration came from the lips of a queer little man perched upon a wagonful of firewood, behind a brace of oxen that were hauling it easily along with a simulation of mighty effort which had evidently not imposed on their lord and master.
The last chance wayfarer had left a supply of firewood.
There was a fumbling at the latch, then the door swung in and Haythorne entered with an armful of firewood.
So you just climb out and chop firewood, and plenty of it.
In the inhabited parts we bought a little firewood, hired pasture for the animals, and bivouacked in the corner of the same field with them.
Just a common block of firewood, one of those thick, solid logs that are put on the fire in winter to make cold rooms cozy and warm.
The distance had been measured off, and as he neared the pile of firewood which marked the end of the hundred yards, a cheer began to grow and grow, which burst into a roar as he passed the firewood and halted at command.
And this is just the time and place for you to get in the firewood for morning while I wash up the dishes and put the kitchen in order.
I had no notion of a kiln, such as the potters burn in, or of glazing them with lead, though I had some lead to do it with; but I placed three large pipkins and two or three pots in a pile, one upon another, and placed my firewood all round it, with a great heap of embers under them.
Great heaps of ashes; stagnant pools, overgrown with rank grass and duckweed; broken turnstiles; and the upright posts of palings long since carried off for firewood, which menaced all heedless walkers with their jagged and rusty nails; were the leading features of the landscape: while here and there a donkey, or a ragged horse, tethered to a stake, and cropping off a wretched meal from the coarse stunted turf, were quite in keeping with the scene, and would have suggested (if the houses had not done so, sufficiently, of themselves) how very poor the people were who lived in the crazy huts adjacent, and how foolhardy it might prove for one who carried money, or wore decent clothes, to walk that way alone, unless by daylight.