cartesian coordinate system

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cartesian coordinate system

[kär′tē·zhən kō′ȯrd·nət ‚sis·təm]
(mathematics)
A coordinate system in n dimensions where n is any integer made by using n number axes which intersect each other at right angles at an origin, enabling any point within that rectangular space to be identified by the distances from the n lines. Also known as rectangular cartesian coordinate system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Skewness of rotated coordinates cannot be avoided in Minkowski's diagrams because relative rotation of coordinates must be restricted to the first quadrant in Scheme I (or in the one-world picture), as deduced earlier.
Now corresponding to the unprimed frame ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) of the 4-observer (Peter, Peter) prescribed on the flat four-dimensional metric spacetime ([SIGMA], ct) earlier, is the unprimed intrinsic frame ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) of intrinsic 2-observer ([phi]Peter, [phi]Peter) in the two-dimensional metric intrinsic spacetime ([phi][rho], [phi]c[phi]t) underlying ([SIGMA], ct) in the first quadrant in Fig.
The fact that the intrinsic angle [phi][psi] can have values in the range [0, [pi]/2) in the first quadrant in Figs.