Fischer-Tropsch process


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Fischer-Tropsch process

(fĭsh`ər-trōpsh), method for the synthesis of hydrocarbons and other aliphatic compounds. Synthesis gas, a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide, is reacted in the presence of an iron or cobalt catalyst; much heat is evolved, and such products as methane, synthetic gasoline and waxes, and alcohols are made, with water or carbon dioxide produced as a byproduct. An important source of the hydrogen–carbon monoxide gas mixture is the gasification of coal (see water gaswater gas,
colorless poisonous gas that burns with an intensely hot, bluish (nearly colorless) flame. The gas is a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen with very small amounts of other gases, e.g., carbon dioxide, and is almost entirely combustible as a result.
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). The process is named after F. Fischer and H. Tropsch, the German coal researchers who discovered it in 1923.

Fischer-Tropsch process

[¦fish·ər ¦trōpsh ‚präs·əs]
(chemical engineering)
A catalytic process to synthesize hydrocarbons and their oxygen derivatives by the controlled reaction of hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

Fischer-Tropsch process

The synthesis of hydrocarbons and, to a lesser extent, of aliphatic oxygenated compounds by the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. The synthesis was discovered in 1923 by F. Fischer and H. Tropsch at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute for Coal Research in Mulheim, Germany. The reaction is highly exothermic, and the reactor must be designed for adequate heat removal to control the temperature and avoid catalyst deterioration and carbon formation. The sulfur content of the synthesis gas must be extremely low to avoid poisoning the catalyst. See Coal gasification

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The guests will receive an overview of the Pearl GTL effluent treatment plant that treats water using the Fischer-Tropsch process, and other alternative processes that secrete less pollution than traditional fossil fuels.
The guests will receive an overview of the Pearl GTL effluent treatment plant (ETP) that treats water using the Fischer-Tropsch process, and other alternative processes that secrete less pollution than traditional fossil fuels.
The Fischer-Tropsch process converts a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen into liquid hydrocarbons.
Based on production, the market is segmented into Methanol to Gasoline (MTG) process, gasoline plus process, fischer-tropsch process.
The basic technology was developed in Germany in the 1920s as a Fischer-Tropsch process named after its inventors.
This ambitious and innovative project tackles the challenge to produce renewable fuels through the conversion of CO2 to SynGas (CO + H2), which can be subsequently transformed into liquid hydrocarbons through the known Fischer-Tropsch process, and it would address the three quarters of the global energy demand.
South Africa and a few other places use the Fischer-Tropsch process to create much of their liquid hydrocarbons, with coal as the carbon source.
Alternatively, solar thermochemical processes can produce carbon monoxide from carbon dioxide and hydrogen from water, or both can be produced from the solar steam reformation of methane, and the resulting gas mixture can be used to produce more conventional liquid fuels via the Fischer-Tropsch process.
A Fischer-Tropsch plant has three stages: a gas reformer at the front; a refining unit at the back end (both which involve very conventional, well-understood technology); and a middle unit, a series of gas converters with catalysts that is the heart of the Fischer-Tropsch process.
This makes the method as versatile as the Fischer-Tropsch process that is already approved, but it requires much lower initial investment.
The current approach of converting natural gas to liquid fuels is through the Fischer-Tropsch process.
The topics include the development of catalytic processes from terpenes to chemicals, furan-based building blocks from carbohydrates, fats and oils as raw materials for the chemical industry, biomass-to-liquids by the Fischer-Tropsch process, and carbon dioxide as a valuable source of carbon for chemical and fuels.