Fish Spear

Fish Spear

 

(in Russian, ostroga), a forked, piercing implement used in fishing. The tines of a fish spear are usually metal; however, wooden or bone tines are used among some peoples. Russian fishermen mounted an iron spear resembling a pitchfork on a slender pole (ratovishche), which was approximately 4 m long. There usually were three tines, but sometimes there were as few as two or as many as 12. Each tine was about 0.25 m long and had a barb to hold the fish securely.

A two-tined spear (sandov’) formerly used in the Caspian Sea for catching sheatfish had an iron ring at the end of the handle with a towline, which was reeled by hand or was attached to the boat. Another variation of the fish spear was a harpoonlike instrument (kutilo) used for hunting various types of sea animals.

In the USSR, spear fishing is illegal.

References in periodicals archive ?
Fish spear or gig with spring-loaded jaws, as identified by Gary Webster, New Port Richey, Fla.
Techniques for tying knots as well as building blowguns, fish spears, bird bolas, crossbows and boomerangs are included.
He noted that wooden and bone-tipped prongs of fish spears were being replaced with prongs made from fencing wire by the time of his visit (Spencer 1928:797).