FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction


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Related to FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction: Relativistic length contraction, Space contraction

FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction

The contraction of a moving body in the direction of its motion. In 1892 G. F. FitzGerald and H. A. Lorentz proposed independently that the failure of the Michelson-Morley experiment to detect an absolute motion of the Earth in space arose from a physical contraction of the interferometer in the direction of the Earth's motion. According to this hypothesis, as formulated more exactly by Albert Einstein in the special theory of relativity, a body in motion with speed v is contracted by a factor in the direction of motion, where c is the speed of light. See Light, Relativity

FitzGerald-Lorentz contraction

[fits¦jer·əld lə′rens kən‚trak·shən]
(relativity)
The contraction of a moving body in the direction of its motion when its speed is comparable to the speed of light. Also known as Lorentz contraction; Lorentz-FitzGerald contraction.
References in periodicals archive ?
Here the Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction is a real dynamical effect of absolute motion, unlike the Einstein spacetime view that it is merely a spacetime perspective artifact, and whose magnitude depends on the choice of observer.
The relativistic Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction effect causes the arm AB parallel to the absolute velocity to be physically contracted to length
2] - 1), while neglect of the Fitzgerald-Lorentz contraction effect gives [k.