flaneur

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flaneur

a stroller, watcher, observer. The concept has poetic origins in the work of Charles Baudelaire (e.g. Art in Paris, 1845-62). He used it to encapsulate the new, metropolitan character type of the 1840s: the man in the urban crowd, the man whose outlook is shaped by the mobile gallery of metropolitan existence. The most notable sociological application of the concept is to be found in the work of Walter BENJAMIN (1983). In his Arcades project he presents the city as a labyrinth or a multi-layered social universe. Benjamin plays on the ambiguity of the concept to convey the sense of a stroller-watcher of urban forms as well as a detective or unscrambler of codes. The concept has been criticized by feminists for marginalizing womens distinctive urban experience. Wolff (1985) attempts to retrieve this experience with the concept of the flaneuse, or ‘the woman in the crowd’. Recent work on postmodernism, urban sociology and the sociology of consumption has used the concept offlanerie to refer to looking, observing (social types, configurations and urban milieux), decoding the hieroglyphics of the city (spatial images, architecture, advertising and the general ‘sign economy’) and reading texts and images about the city.
References in periodicals archive ?
Benjamin's hero, however, is the detective-like metropolitan man, the kind of flaneur being an active participant of the public.
Since securing a job, the flaneur can only haunt the streets by night, like a true ghost.
E o espaco real das ruas, do tracado urbano, das relacoes de vizinhanca, da encenacao da vida, dos habitos e fazes mundanos, tao caros aos fisiologistas, flaneurs ou cronistas (nossos jornalistas pioneiros) esvazia-se, "como se o 'povoamento do tempo' das telecomunicacoes (liberacao de linhas, interrupcao.
While the original flaneur did not participate in acts of consumption, Rubbino's child and adult characters are involved constantly in consumer behaviours as they purchase entrance tickets to various landmarks, consume local delicacies, buy mementoes, and so forth.
MY SECOND TRIP to Paris led to my thinking of myself as a flaneur of sorts-that uniquely Parisian figure, thanks to Baudelaire, who found meaning in wandering the city's streets for "refuge in the crowd," in Benjamin's words.
Organized by Les flaneurs erratiques, a new interdisciplinary and digital art organization directed by Sophie Castonguay, the event drew 200 people over two evenings.
The flaneurs absolute independence also expresses itself in his total self-absorption.
Mas antes de chegar ao jornalismo, precisariamos dissecar um tipo que derivou do fisiologista e que veio dar no jornalista moderno: o flaneur.
More recent contributions have pointed to Parisian park-life or advertising and to the emergence of department stores and forms of (window) shopping as areas where middleclass women towards the end of the 19thCentury would have achieved a public presence, (7) whereas cinema-going appears to have been the single activity up until World War II that could legitimate female spectatorship and streetwalking (Friedberg, "Les Flaneurs du Mal(1)"; Bruno, Streetwalking on a Ruined Map; Gleber).
Benjamin's elaboration of the ambivalent nature of flaneur lends us a critical eye to examine the pro-bourgeois and pro-institutional tendency of Conrad's male characters beneath their apparent roles as subversive flaneurs.
Corridor and Kari's flaneurs are also practitioners of the underground:
Herbert (1988: 33) considera flaneurs sobre todo a Manet, Degas y Caillebote.