Flattery


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Related to Flattery: Flattery will get you nowhere, Imitation Is the Sincerest Form of Flattery

Flattery

Adams, Jack
toady to his employer. [Br. Lit.: Dombey and Son]
Amaziah
fawningly complains of Amos to King Jeroboam. [O.T.: Amos 7:10]
bolton
one who flatters by pretending humility. [Br. Hist.: Espy, 343]
Chanticleer
cajoled by fox into singing; thus captured. [Br. Lit.: Canterbury Tales, “Nun’s Priest’s Tale”]
Clumsy, Sir Tunbelly
toadies towards aristocracy. [Br. Lit.: The Relapse, Walsh Modern, 102]
Collins, Mr.
priggish, servile clergyman; toady to the great. [Br. Lit.: Pride and Prejudice]
Damocles
for his sycophancy to Dionysus, seated under sword at banquet. [Gk. Myth.: LLEI, I: 278]
Mutual Admiration Society
circle of mutual patters on the backs. [Br. Hist.: Wheeler, 254]
oreo
cookie; pejoratively refers to obsequious Black with white aspirations. [Am. Culture: Flexner, 49]
Ruach
island of people sustained by insincere praise. [Fr. Lit.: Pantagruel]
Tom, Uncle Stowe
character came to signify subservient Black. [Am. Lit.: Uncle Tom’s Cabin]
Wren, Jenny
wooed by Robin Redbreast with enticing presents. [Nurs. Rhyme: Mother Goose, 23]
References in classic literature ?
Ay, ay, vanity is truly the motive-power that moves humanity, and it is flattery that greases the wheels.
She could not greatly influence her daughter-in-law against me, because, between that lady and herself there was a mutual dislike--chiefly shown by her in secret detractions and calumniations; by the other, in an excess of frigid formality in her demeanour; and no fawning flattery of the elder could thaw away the wall of ice which the younger interposed between them.
Harmless words in themselves, pursuing the same smooth course of flattery as before--but with what a different result
However, it was not all a bed of roses for des Lupeaulx; he flattered and advised his master, forced to flatter in order to advise, to advise while flattering, and disguise the advice under the flattery.
Then quoth the King, "If I might catch False and Flattery or any of their masters, I would avenge me on the wretches that work so ill, and would hang them by the neck and all that them abet.
The hungry servant attended Miss Squeers in her own room according to custom, to curl her hair, perform the other little offices of her toilet, and administer as much flattery as she could get up, for the purpose; for Miss Squeers was quite lazy enough (and sufficiently vain and frivolous withal) to have been a fine lady; and it was only the arbitrary distinctions of rank and station which prevented her from being one.
Their amazing vanity makes them swallow flattery so gross that it is an insult, and men will always be ready to tell the precise number of lies that a woman is ready to listen to.
She knows her power, and she uses it too; but well knowing that to wheedle and coax is safer than to command, she judiciously tempers her despotism with flattery and blandishments enough to make him deem himself a favoured and a happy man.
But what rebuke their plain fraternal bearing casts on the mutual flattery with which authors solace each other and wound themselves
It is no wonder that in an age when this kind of merit is so little in fashion, and so slenderly provided for, persons possessed of it should very eagerly flock to a place where they were sure of being received with great complaisance; indeed, where they might enjoy almost the same advantages of a liberal fortune as if they were entitled to it in their own right; for Mr Allworthy was not one of those generous persons who are ready most bountifully to bestow meat, drink, and lodging on men of wit and learning, for which they expect no other return but entertainment, instruction, flattery, and subserviency; in a word, that such persons should be enrolled in the number of domestics, without wearing their master's cloathes, or receiving wages.
If I ever see that flat any more I'm a flat, and if you do you're flatter; and that's no flattery.
They who believe their merit neglected and unappreciated, make up one class; they who receive adulation and flattery, knowing their own worthlessness, compose the other.