Flaubert

(redirected from Flaubertian)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Flaubert

Gustave . 1821--80, French novelist and short- story writer, regarded as a leader of the 19th-century naturalist school. His most famous novel, Madame Bovary (1857), for which he was prosecuted (and acquitted) on charges of immorality, and L'?ducation sentimentale (1869) deal with the conflict of romantic attitudes and bourgeois society. His other major works include Salammb? (1862), La Tentation de Saint Antoine (1874), and Trois contes (1877)
References in periodicals archive ?
Flaubertian techniques seem almost designed for achieving such complex rhetorical and ethical effects.
The Flaubertian table--and in fact, to a larger extent, the novel as a whole--owes its shape to the hollowness it holds.
A Flaubertian version of ironic, authorial juxtaposition is the chemist Homais's self-promoting example of "a businessman with considerable connections" as "a lawyer, a doctor, a chemist.
In an age of the increasingly ephemeral, Kundera has long championed the permanence of art and the Flaubertian ideal of making every word count.
One is tempted to agree with Anni Carlsson when she says that fragmentary writing is fragmentary knowledge, and when she wonders whether Novalis is Jean Paul's Quintus Fixlein--an irrepressible romantic dabbler who is an ancestor of the Flaubertian Bouvard et Pecuchet and the Sartrean autodidact--all of them reveling in "literary Saturnalia" instead of preparing sober festivals of crystalline analytical understanding.
We thus have a wonderfully ironic pattern, typically Flaubertian and Petronian.
4 Sehnsucht (Valeska Grisebach) Minor-key cinema par excellence, this sensitive treatment of a mundane theme--a small-town love triangle--achieves a Flaubertian complexity.
I would not dare even attempt an answer to this Flaubertian conundrum.
1) Though his book comes close on the heels of Geoffrey Wall's fine 2001 biography, Brown's life of the contradictory master of Croisset adds not only an abundance of fresh facts but also a density of detail almost Flaubertian in effect.
what he called the Flaubertian mode; he had grown impatient with an
It is Romanticism's depiction of the relationship between poet and reader that imbues this passage with its rhetoric, which, when Michelet comes to write L "Oiseau [The Bird] has undergone a sea change brought about at least in part by the revolutions of 1848 and by the very different thrusts and tactics of Balzacian and Flaubertian Realism.
The critics had their knives sharpened: had the author fallen victim to Flaubertian ambitions?