Flint


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Flint,

city (1990 pop. 140,761), seat of Genesee co., SE Mich., on the Flint River; inc. 1855. Since 1902 it has been an automobile-manufacturing centers. The General Motors Corp. had its beginnings (1908) in Flint, where many major automobile makers (Chrysler, Chevrolet, Nash, Champion, Buick) also started. A fur-trading post (1819) here was succeeded by a settlement in which lumbering and then cart and carriage making were the major industries. In 1937, sitdown strikes by the United Automobile Workers (UAW) in Flint's General Motors plants spurred widespread labor organization. During the 1980s and 90s massive layoffs at General Motors large-car factories devastated Flint's economy. Attempts at economic diversification and revitalization have had limited success, and in 2002 municipal financial problems led the state to take control of the city government. Attempts to reduced costs by switching (2014–15) the city's water supply from Detroit water to the Flint River led to health problems, most notably lead contamination, when the water's corrosiveness was not controlled. Local institutions include a branch of the Univ. of Michigan, an art institute, and the Michigan school for the deaf.

Flint,

Welsh Fflint, town (1981 pop. 11,398), Flintshire, NE Wales, on the Dee estuary. Flint has industries that produce rayon, nylon, paper, and clothing. The castle, built c.1300, was the scene of Richard II's submission to Bolingbroke in 1399.

Flint,

river: see ChattahoocheeChattahoochee
, river, 436 mi (702 km) long, rising in N Ga., and flowing generally SW to the Ala.-Ga. border and then S along it to join the Flint River in Lake Seminole on the Ga.-Fla. line; the combined waters form the Apalachicola River, c.
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, river.

flint,

variety of quartzquartz,
one of the commonest of all rock-forming minerals and one of the most important constituents of the earth's crust. Chemically, it is silicon dioxide, SiO2.
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 that commonly occurs in rounded nodules and whose crystal structure is not visible to the naked eye. Flint is dark gray, smoky brown, or black in color; pale gray flint is called chert. When found in chalk or in other rocks containing lime, the nodules frequently have a white coating. Flint is translucent to opaque. It was early used by primitive peoples for making knives and spearheads because, although it is very hard, it is more readily shaped than stone; edges can be flaked off with comparative ease, especially those of freshly dug pieces, by pressure exerted with a piece of stone or bone. Since it is not chipped by pounding, as stone is, sharper edges are obtained. Use of flint tools defines the Stone Age cultures of the Pleistocene epoch. It was long used with steel for lighting fires and later for setting off the powder in flintlock firearms.

Flint

 

a city in the northern USA, in the state of Michigan. Population, 182,000 (1975; 520,000 including suburbs). Industry employs 85,000 people (1973). A major center of the automobile industry, Flint is the site of several General Motors plants. The city also produces aircraft engines, bicycles, motorcycles, chemicals and military equipment.

flint

[flint]
(mineralogy)
A black or gray, massive, hard, somewhat impure variety of chalcedony, breaking with a conchoidal fracture. Also known as firestone.

flint

A dense, fine-grained stone; a form of silica; naturally occurs in the form of nodules; usually gray, brown, black, or otherwise dark in color, but nodules and other chunks tend to weather white or light shades from the surface inward. Broken “flints, ” as the nodules are called, are used in cobble size, either whole or split (knapped) in mortared walls, esp. in England.

flint

1. an impure opaque microcrystalline greyish-black form of quartz that occurs in chalk. It produces sparks when struck with steel and is used in the manufacture of pottery, flint glass, and road-construction materials. Formula: SiO2
2. colourless glass other than plate glass

Flint

1. a town in NE Wales, in Flintshire, on the Dee estuary. Pop.: 11 936 (2001)
2. a city in SE Michigan: closure of the car production plants led to a high level of unemployment. Pop.: 120 292 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Keith Flint, who had always left it to others to pump up his son's ego, was dealing with one deflated kid.
The ground is still covered with flint, and visitors can see big outcrops of flint bigger than refrigerators, but the actual pits themselves aren't very impressive to look at anymore," says Ed Day, a retired park ranger at Alibates who occasionally returns to work as a volunteer.
With the ATO relying heavily on its technology platform for its internal communication initiative, Flint and her team set about enhancing and developing a balanced suite of communication tools:
After a fruitless three-year-old campaign, Johnson Houghton abandoned Flint River to Jim Goldie.
But the plants had not exactly flourished and there was no suggestion Flint was a drug dealer.
Lerud says the regional structure allows Flint Communications to compete against other agencies and companies in North Dakota, Iowa and Minnesota.
If there weren't valet parking attendants hovering under and around a fancy umbrella (with the name Flints inscribed in small letters) outside the door, Flints could be the hardest eating place to find on the Westside.
business, labor, community, and education leaders to serve on the Flint leadership team for poverty reduction.
Flint is undoubtedly the model that Brent references in the above excerpt of the lecherous slave master who bribes and whispers "foul talk" to the helpless slave girl.
His owner Janine Higgins was distraught when Flint lost his voice and his feathers fell out.
When Flint and others concluded that the General Sherman is the largest tree in the world, they did so based on the tree's volume - the mass of its enormous trunk.
The city of Flint, for example, could wind up owing GM as much as $70 million if the company wins in court.